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Plymouth Police Department

Plymouth Police in the News

Plymouth Police Department received the designation of Accredited Police Department

The department started the review of its standards and policies few years ago.

The Plymouth Police Department received the designation of Accredited Police Department by a unanimous vote of the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission at the semi-annual meeting. We are now one of 90 Municipal and University Police Departments out of nearly 400 in the Commonwealth that has received this designation.

The department started the review of its standards and policies two years ago and has been working ever since to update procedures on critical areas of police management, operations and technical support

Achieving certification requires an on-site review of 159 standards set by the commission in areas such as policy development, emergency response planning, training, communications, property and evidence handling, use of force, vehicular pursuit, prisoner transportation and holding facilities. A team of commission-appointed assessors visited the department for the assessment in April.

Chief Michael Botieri appointed Lt. Dana Flynn to serve as the department’s accreditation manager two years ago. Botieri cited Flynn for his work on the certification process and thanked everyone in the department for their support and cooperation in earning certification.

“It shows we’re staying on the cutting edge of law enforcement professionalism in our procedures, rules and standards of operation,” Botieri said.

The process of accreditation continues with the review of more than 100 more standards set by the commission. The certification has been granted for a period of three years. Botieri said he expects the department to earn full accreditation from the commission next year.

 

RECENT NEWS

The following are links to items about the activities of the Plymouth Police Department that have appeared on a variety of news sources.

Links to News articles about the Plymouth Police Department. If you would like to see articles from past years click here.

April 2020

March 2020

Keven Joyce’s probation is over – almost as soon as it began.

A judge dismissed the larceny case against the Precinct 15 Town Meeting representative last Friday, four days after Joyce reached a plea agreement with prosecutors over money missing from the Little Red School House in Cedarville.

As part of the deal, Joyce was to pay restitution to the town of $23,676.44 for fees he collected while serving as volunteer manager of the town-owned building for more than five years.

Joyce was required to pay $17,901.44 that was frozen in a bank account without delay. That money represented fees Joyce collected from groups using the building for weekly meetings over the years.

He was also given up to a year to repay $5,775 that he admitted he took from the fees as a gas allowance for his work in overseeing the building. Judge James Sullivan gave Joyce up to a year to repay the $5,775, while continuing the case without a finding until March 1, 2021.

The judge said probation would end and he would dismiss the case once all of the money was reimbursed.

A short, but unavoidable delay in freeing up the checking account resulted in Joyce paying back the $5,775 before the $17,901.44 was released by the bank. Both amounts were paid in full last week and the judge dismissed the larceny charge against Joyce at the request of probation officials on Friday.

Still unclear is a Joyce’s status as a town official.

As part of the plea agreement, Joyce was to step away from town government, a term of his probation.

Court records offer two slightly different interpretations of what that specifically meant. On one form, he was ordered to “refrain from/relinquish any and all positions with the town of Plymouth i.e. commissions, appointments, etc.” On another, he was ordered to “refrain and relinquish any political or volunteer position with the town of Plymouth or governmental body in the town of Plymouth.”

Joyce has been an elected town meeting representative in Plymouth for many years. He was re-elected to his most recent three-year term last year. That term expires in 2022.

According to Town Clerk Laurence Pizer, Joyce is also a member of the town’s Affordable Housing Trust, with a term ending in 2021. He is also the chairman of the town’s Disabilities Committee, even though his term ended in 2018, and on the Cable Advisory Committee, even though that term ended in 2014.

Pizer said members of both committees remain members even after their terms expire until they resign or are replaced. Joyce is also on the town’s Skating Rink Committee.

Joyce was originally accused of stealing more than $25,000 from the town after a police investigation of the handling of fees at the Little Red School House. He maintained his innocence, saying he held the money in a separate account for repairs at the building and only took the $5,775 as a gas allowance.

An embezzlement charge was dismissed last summer. A charge of withholding evidence from an official proceeding was dismissed last week. At the same time, Sullivan continued the larceny case without a finding after Joyce admitted to sufficient facts for a finding of guilt.

Pizer said Joyce made no efforts to step down from any town positions during his brief stint on probation last week. In an interview Tuesday, he said plans to continue as a Town Meeting representative and has not made up his mind about the other positions.

Joyce said he has been soured greatly about his volunteer service in town and will likely resign his position with the Disabilities Commission, even though he does not have to. He said he will also most likely step down from the Affordable Housing Trust, even though he has been asked by the chairman to stay on. The Cable Advisory Committee has not met in two years, he said.

A spokesman for the Secretary of State’s Election Division said Wednesday that there is precedent for a plea agreement to include restrictions on elected officials, but noted that court proceedings usually only involve cases where an official has been convicted of a felony. Otherwise, town charter would govern an official’s status.

Pizer said he assumed any decisions made by the courts would be enforced by the courts.

Pizer was facing a Friday deadline for including a vacancy for an uncompleted term in Precinct 15 on the ballot for the Town Election should Joyce step down. Selectmen would also have to approve that move, he said.

Town Manger Melissa Arrighi, who was consulted by prosecutors about terms of last week’s plea agreement, said she believes Joyce will honor the intent of the agreement about government service, but remained primarily concerned about getting the town’s money back.

“I think he wants town government to be successful and any work done by them to be successful,” she said.

Arrighi said she was not sure if Joyce could be prevented from serving an elected position, adding that she is more concerned with the Disabilities Commission, which has had trouble getting a quorum to meet and needs to get work done.

Keven Joyce Admits Sufficient Facts. 

PLYMOUTH – A plea agreement has ended the state’s prosecution of resident Keven Joyce for stealing money from the town while managing the Little Red School House.

Joyce was a long time Town Meeting representative.

Joyce admitted to sufficient facts for a finding of guilty on a lone charge of larceny of more than $1,200 Monday in Plymouth District Court. But Judge James Sullivan said he would adopt recommendations from prosecutors and the defense and continue the case without a finding for one year, rather than find Joyce guilty of a crime.

Joyce agreed to pay the town $23,676 in restitution. He also agreed to “relinquish any and all political positions in the town of Plymouth.”

As part of the agreement, Sullivan dismissed a related charge of withholding evidence from an official proceeding. Another judge dismissed a related charge of embezzlement against Joyce last summer.

The agreement calls for Joyce to pay the town $17,901 immediately. That’s the amount of money in a bank account he opened to collect user fees for the town-owned Little Red School House in Cedarville over a period of several years.

Joyce must also pay back $5,775 that he gave himself for expenses in serving as volunteer manager of the building, which is used for meetings by Girl Scouts and groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon.

Sullivan placed Joyce on administrative probation for one year, but said the probation would end and the case would be dismissed as soon as Joyce makes full restitution.

Joyce, 71, declined to comment after the plea agreement was completed. Defense attorney Jack Atwood called the agreement a “just outcome.”

Town officials maintained they had never seen any of the money. Police eventually charged Joyce with embezzlement, larceny and withholding evidence, claiming that Joyce stole more than $25,000 from the town.

Joyce maintained his innocence, arguing that most of the money went into a bank account that he never touched. He admitted to taking some money for gas and mileage.

Sullivan said the state’s decision to dismiss the embezzlement charge against Joyce last summer was part of an agreement to resolve the case before trial. Sullivan said the emphasis has been in making the town whole for its losses.

Assistant District Attorney Carolan Blackwood told Sullivan she consulted with Plymouth Town Manager Melissa Arrighi before reaching the agreement with Joyce Monday afternoon. Blackwood said she and Arrighi arrived at the same restitution amount independently.

Atwood insisted that Joyce never intended to steal any money from the town and pointed to the untouched bank account as proof.

“The important thing is he never withdrew any money,” Atwood said.

“He agrees mileage was wrong, but there was no intent to take any money,” Atwood said.

The state based its restitution amount on a combination of the money that was in the account Joyce used to collect fees and an accounting of gas money he reimbursed himself over five and a half years. Blackwood said the state determined that Joyce reimbursed himself at a rate of $50 for 21 weeks over five and half years.

Atwood said Joyce has no difficulty in resigning his position with the town.

They are many. Joyce had been a town meeting representative since 2008, first from Precinct 5 and later from Precinct 15. He was re-elected to a three-year term representing Precinct 15 last year. Joyce was also a member of the Affordable Housing Trust, the Skating Rink Committee and the Commission of Disabilities.

PLYMOUTH — A Plymouth man is set to face criminal charges after police say a gun he was handling misfired and hit a baby in the apartment next door. The baby, who was shot in the foot, is expected to be OK.

The 22-year-old man, who has not been identified, will be charged with discharging a weapon within 500 feet of a building and assault and battery by means of a firearm. Police said he will not be arrested, but summonsed to Plymouth District Court at a later date.

Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri said Tuesday that police were called to a multi-family apartment building on Forrest Avenue around 10:30 a.m. Sunday for a report of a gun misfiring.

Police said the 22-year-old man who was handling the gun called them right away, reported what happened and was cooperative in their investigation. The man told police he was putting a trigger guard on a handgun when it misfired, sending a bullet through the wall of the apartment and into the one next door.

“I think he definitely didn’t mean to discharge the weapon,” Botieri said.

Police said the man’s license to carry has been suspended and that they confiscated the gun.

When police responded, they found an 11-month-old baby had been shot. The parents were home at the time and heard the shot, but didn’t realize it was a gunshot.

“They thought it was like a charger in an outlet sparking or something,” Botieri said.

WCVB, The Patriot Ledger’s media partner, spoke to the family of the injured baby, named Noah.

The bullet also hit the mattress that Noah’s older brother, Artu, slept on the night before. Had Artu been sleeping on the same mattress at the time the gun was discharged, it could have hit him in the head.

Noah was rushed to Beth Israel Deaconess hospital in Plymouth, and later taken to a Boston hospital. Botieri said the child’s injuries were considered non-life-threatening, and Amori said his son was recovering.

 

Baby Grazed By Neighbors Bullet

PLYMOUTH — Police are seeking to charge a Plymouth resident after they injured a baby by accidentally discharging a gun.

Plymouth police Capt. Kevin J. Manuel said an 11-month-old baby suffered a graze wound from a bullet when a round was accidentally discharged from a neighbor’s weapon.

The incident happened around 11 a.m. Sunday at an address on Forest Avenue.

Manuel said the neighbor is licensed to carry the firearm.

The Plymouth Police Department is seeking out a charge for discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a building. Manuel said the gun owner could face other charges.

Plymouth police hope to file the charge by Tuesday morning.

 

11  Month Old Baby grazed by Bullet

PLYMOUTH – An 11-month-old baby was injured Sunday after the accidental discharge of a neighbor’s gun in North Plymouth.

Police said the neighbor was putting a trigger lock on a handgun in his apartment on Forest Avenue late Sunday morning, when the gun fired a 9mm bullet through his wall and into the neighboring apartment.

The bullet struck and shattered a cellphone charger. Capt. Kevin Manuel said the bullet or pieces of the shattered charger then grazed the baby’s foot.

Manuel said the baby’s parents initially thought the baby had been injured by an exploding charger. The family took the baby to the hospital. The infant was treated for injuries and is fine, Manuel said.

The owner of the gun alerted officials and ultimately his neighbors about the source of charger explosion after calling police at 11:02 a.m. The man told police he was putting a trigger lock on the gun and didn’t realize there was a round in the chamber and it accidentally fired.

Police checked with the neighbors and learned the family had already taken their baby to the hospital.

Manuel said the 22-year-old will be summoned to court on a charge of discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a dwelling.

 

February 2020

Teen to face charges in Plymouth Vandalism Spree

PLYMOUTH – Police have accused a local teen of last week’s vandalism spree on the downtown waterfront.

The 17-year-old local high school student will be charged with 11 felony counts of vandalism to property and one misdemeanor count of trespassing. Police are not releasing the boy’s name because he is a juvenile. He will face charges in Juvenile Court.

The charges stem from the Feb. 17 spree that targeted Plymouth Rock, Forefathers Monument and several other landmarks and attractions along the waterfront.

Police Chief Michael Botieri said detectives reviewed hours of videotape footage of the downtown area in building a case against the boy.

In addition to Plymouth Rock and Forefathers Monument, the boy is charged with damaging the Plymouth Maiden statue and a memorial bench in Brewster Gardens, a memorial stone and concrete slab at the entrance to the harbor jetty, the waterfront bandstand, a town map in Shirley Square and four Scallop Roll statues.

Most of the damage included the words and letters 508 MOF. Botieri said the boy offered no explanation for what was written.

“He eventually cooperated, but never gave a good reason why he spray painted,” Botieri said.

He said there is not a stiffer charge for vandalizing historic landmarks. The charges are only heightened if war monuments or veterans memorials are targeted.

The vandalism charges carrying potential sentences of three years in jail and a $1,500 fine. The lesser, trespassing charge was added for going into the portico at Plymouth Rock.

Driver will face multiple charges

PLYMOUTH – A woman who crashed a car into a utility pole near the downtown skate park earlier this week will face a number of charges.

Police said the 49-year-old local woman suffered minor injuries when she crashed into a pole at Summer and Edes streets at 3:47 p.m. Monday.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said an investigation determined the woman was driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol and was in possession of suboxone and a prescription muscle relaxer. Manuel said the woman was also driving her son’s vehicle without permission and had taken money from his wallet.

She will face charges of driving under the influence of drugs, driving under the influence of alcohol, possession of a Class B substance, possession of a Class E substance, using a motor vehicle without authority and larceny of less than $1,200.

Manuel said the woman and her son will also face firearms charges because police found a firearm owned by the son in the vehicle.

The woman will be charged with carrying a firearm without a license. The 26-year-old son will be charged with leaving a firearm unsecured.

Manuel said both will be issued summons to appear in court. The woman was not arrested immediately because she was taken to the hospital for treatment of injuries, Manuel said.

 

Police have arrested a Florida man in check cashing scheme

PLYMOUTH – Police have arrested a Florida man in connection with a check cashing scheme targeting area banks.

Jose Pavon-Estupinan, 25, of 7503 West Hannah St., Tampa, Florida, was charged Thursday afternoon with uttering a false check and forging/misusing a Registry of Motor Vehicles document.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said Pavon-Estupinian is accused of using a fake driver’s license in an attempt to cash a fake check at the downtown branch of Eastern Bank.

Manuel said a clerk at the bank became suspicious about Pavon-Estupinian and called police as he tried to cash a check shortly after 3:30 p.m. Police arrested Pavon-Estupinian after determining his license and the check were bogus.

Manuel said police believe Pavon-Estupinian is part of a group that has been using fake licenses to cash fake checks at banks throughout the region. Banks in Wareham, Marion and Sandwich have been targeted by the group, he said.

At the same time police were arresting Pavon-Estupinian at the downtown Eastern Bank, another man was trying to cash a check with a fake license at the Eastern Bank branch in West Plymouth.

Manuel said the teller there became suspicious about the man’s license and called police, but the man fled before police arrived.

 

Plymouth Rock and other monuments targeted with spray paint. 

PLYMOUTH – “Why? Why? Why would someone do this?” Gayle Manning asked as she looked down at vandalized Plymouth Rock Monday morning.

The Kingston woman was one of many who traveled to the Plymouth waterfront to express disgust for the overnight damage to the landmark and other waterfront monuments by vandals wielding cans of spray paint.

Police Chief Michael Botieri said Plymouth Rock, which is in Pilgrim Memorial State Park, and the Pilgrim Maiden statue and a memorial granite bench across the street in town-owned Brewster Gardens, and at least four of the Scallop Roll statues scattered about the waterfront by the Plymouth Area Chamber of Commerce last year, were tagged with paint overnight.

Similar graffiti was also found more than a mile away at the base of National Monument to the Forefathers, also state owned, off Allerton Street. That graffiti includes obscene messages. Photos of that scene are not being published.

Much of the graffiti was smears of paint and indecipherable, Botieri said, but several of the landmarks were tagged with the numbers and letters 508 MOF. The graffiti at Forefathers Monument included obscene messages, included one aimed at local police.

Police detectives were reviewing surveillance video from the area in hopes of identifying the vandals, Botieri said. Police were also seen searching along the rocky waterfront for discarded paint containers.

Botieri said it does not appear to be any political connection to the graffiti, but those who gathered at Plymouth Rock Monday morning could not help but wonder.

Manning noted that the graffiti occurred on Presidents Day and in 2020, which is the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims landing at Plymouth Rock.

Maintenance crews from the town and the state quickly set to work Monday cleaning up the graffiti with power washers and a solvent that has proven effective at cleaning past vandalism.

Plymouth Rock has been targeted occasionally over the years, sometimes by people with a specific political agenda.

Botieri acknowledged that this most recent vandalism was beyond the scope of tagging incidents in the past.

“Seeing this type of disrespect for the historic reminders of the Mayflower story is both sad and unsettling,” Lea Filson, the executive director of local tourism agency See Plymouth, said in a statement. “The outpouring of concern and anger over the incident has been a positive ending to a thoughtless gesture.

“As Plymouth commemorates the 400th anniversary of the landing of the Mayflower this year, we have already begun welcoming international and domestic visitors. The waterfront and the historic district are safe, well- lit, and will continue to welcome all who visit.”

The four defaced objects are but a few of the many monuments, museums, attractions, restaurants, and family activities offered in Plymouth, Filson noted, adding that the graffiti was removed within a few hours.

 

PLYMOUTH – A Town Meeting representative and candidate for selectman may have been too zealous in looking into Fire Department response times.

Police are investigating whether Kevin Lynch broke any laws in following firefighters to a call on Plaza Way Friday night.

Chief Michael Botieri said police are investigating allegations that Lynch was following a fire engine too closely and may have harassed firefighters at the scene.

Police were present at Plaza Way before firefighters arrived and interacted with Lynch, but did not take any action at the scene. But firefighters have since been interviewed about the incident by police and charges or citations could be filed.

 

Fully accredited: Plymouth police recognized for meeting best practices benchmark

PLYMOUTH – Years of behind-the-scenes work has translated into high honors for the Plymouth Police Department.

In a unanimous vote, the department was awarded accreditation by the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission this week. The department is one of 90 municipal and university police departments of nearly 400 in the state that has received the designation.

Police Chief Michael Botieri accepted the honor Monday at the commission’s semi-annual meeting in Dover.

“We are currently in compliance with 339 standards that have been identified by the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission to be the benchmark for best practices in policing,” Botieri said. “This endeavor was not easy and could not have been possible without the efforts of all members of this department, to include the department accreditation manager, Capt. Dana Flynn.”

Flynn was still a lieutenant when Botieri assigned him to oversee the accreditation process in 2016. With the help of patrolmen and supervisors, Flynn and the chief reviewed and, where needed, rewrote policies and procedures to reflect best practices.

Botieri said the standards for accreditation impact officer and public safety, address high liability/risk management issues and generally promote operational efficiency throughout the department, ensuring that written policies, procedures, rules and regulations reflect best practices and promote accountability.

The mandatory standards provide a means of independent evaluation and enhance the reputation of the department. Accreditation also minimizes the department’s exposure to liability, builds a stronger defense against lawsuits, and has the potential to reduce liability insurance costs.

The accreditation is good for three years. The department will be subject to a re-accreditation process again in 2023.

Plymouth joins Abington, Bridgewater, Duxbury and Marion as the only accredited police departments in Plymouth County. Departments in the Plymouth County towns of East Bridgewater, Halifax, Hanson, Hingham, Middleborough, Plympton, Scituate and Whitman are working toward accreditation.

Botieri said the local department will soon proudly proclaim its accreditation with stickers on all cruisers.

“It just means we’re an open book,” Botieri said. “It’s difficult to open your doors to assessors, other lieutenants, captains and chiefs who come in and criticize, but you’ve got to do that and be transparent, and I think the public should feel confidence in us because we’ve gone to that extreme.”

 

January 2020

Plymouth students face charges after prank goes viral

PLYMOUTH — Two Plymouth North High School students are facing charges after performing an internet video prank that went viral.

The students were caught performing the prank after they scorched two electrical outlets in a classroom Tuesday using a penny and a phone charger.

Plymouth firefighters were called to the school at about 12:15 p.m. and found the pronged part of an iPhone charger that had been blackened and scorched. A penny was fused to the prongs of the charger, and an electrical outlet in the back corner of the room was scorched.

A teacher told firefighters that the students had plugged the charger in and dropped a penny between the outlet and the charger, causing the outlet to spark and smoke. The teacher said the students had done it twice in a matter of minutes in the classroom.

Firefighters found there was no fire in the classroom, which was deemed to be safe. No one was injured, according to officials. The Plymouth North students face charges of burning a building, property destruction and disorderly conduct, as well as additional school discipline. The Plymouth Police Department and the State Fire Marshal’s Office were notified and are investigating.

Videos of the prank have been posted on the smartphone micro-video app TikTok. The prank involves partially inserting the pronged part of a phone charger into an outlet and sliding a penny down the wall onto the exposed prongs. This action results in the outlet being scorched and can cause electrical system damage and, in some cases, fire, according to the State Fire Marshal’s Office.

The office said the Plymouth incident is at least the third time this prank has caused damage in the state.

A student at Westford Academy started a fire inside the school Friday, forcing an evacuation, and is facing charges. Another incident happened at a home in Holden.

The Norfolk County Fire Chiefs Association and State Fire Marshal Peter Ostroskey are warning parents to discourage their children from trying the prank.

“Alert them to this challenge, advise them to, not only look for signs of fire play like scorched outlets, but to have conversations about fire and electrical safety with tweens and teenagers,” Ostroskey said in a statement.

A West Plymouth man involved in a shootout with police in 2018 plans a mental health defense when his case goes to trial this spring.

 

West Plymouth man involved in a shootout with police in 2018 plans a mental health defense 

An attorney for Michael Walsh has notified the court that her client intends to raise the issue of his mental condition when he exchanged gunfire with five local officers on April 26, 2018.

Specifically, attorney Sarah Fleming said in pleadings that Walsh intends to raise the issue of lack of criminal responsibility using expert testimony of a psychologist relying on Walsh’s statements.

In asking for funds to hire a psychologist, the defense noted that Walsh has a significant history of traumatic brain injuries, resulting in at least two medical and mental health providers to find that he cannot always be held accountable for his actions.

Walsh, 38, had been scheduled to go to trial next month on a slew of charges connected with the shooting, including seven counts each of armed assault with intent to murder and assault with a dangerous weapon.

He is accused of shooting at his wife and teenaged step-daughter after a domestic disturbance at their Federal Furnace Road home. Police responded in force after mother and daughter fled.

Walsh is accused of firing one shot at officers before retreating briefly into his house. A minute later, he came out firing a handgun. Police returned fire, hitting Walsh with numerous shots. He was ultimately treated for 10 gunshot wounds, including injuries to his head, shoulder, arm, backside and upper torso. No police officers were injured.

Court pleadings show that a video surveillance system at the house captured Walsh shooting at his wife’s car. Pleadings also suggest that Walsh may have intended so-called suicide by cop.

He allegedly told his step-daughter to go ahead and call police because “tonight is my night to die.” He also allegedly texted his wife after police arrived, saying “they’re here, goodbye, I love you.”

Court filings indicate that Walsh’s wife did not know he had a firearm in the house. She wouldn’t allow one, because he suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was injured in the line of duty while working as a police officer in South Carolina.

Walsh had had an altercation with local firefighters a month before the shooting, over a neighbor burning leaves.

Walsh is also facing trial for a 2015 incident in Brockton. Court documents indicate is accused of driving in circles around two minority males while shouting racial slurs and threatening to shoot them with a gun.

Walsh was originally held without bail pending trial, but a judge later set bail at $500,000 on the Plymouth case and $5,000 on the Brockton case.

He was released on bail after his wife posted $505,000 in cash for his release.

Walsh was ordered to wear a GPS bracelet and maintain home confinement, except to attend medical, legal and court appointments, as conditions of his release. He was also ordered to be drug and alcohol free and be subject to medical and psychological evaluation.

A judge refused to revoke bail, but added conditions that Walsh turn in his license and not drive and report all police interactions with probation officials.

Walsh most recently was scheduled for trial Feb. 10, but at a hearing last week the case was continued until May after Fleming, his court-appointed lawyer, requested that a second psychologist review his case.

Pleadings also address why the state is paying for Walsh’s defense, even though his wife has posted a large amount of money for his release. The defense notes that Walsh’s wife is a named victim and considered an adverse witness, so her financial resources should not be imputed to him, despite her intention at this point not to cooperate with the prosecution.

Missing teen found safe in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A reverse 911 call helped locate a missing autistic teen in downtown Plymouth Thursday night.

Police put out calls for the 16-year-old boy several hours after he was overdue in returning home from school Thursday afternoon. The message described the boy and asked anyone who saw him to call police.

Employees at a Court Street restaurant contacted police after getting one of the calls just before midnight.

Manuel said the restaurant had taken in the boy and employees were giving him something to eat. Police and paramedics responded and took the boy to BID-Plymouth hospital for evaluation.

 

A drunken driving arrest has cost James Hanna his job

PLYMOUTH – A weekend drunken driving arrest has cost James Hanna his job as principal of Plymouth South High School.

In a letter sent to parents and guardians of students Monday afternoon, Superintendent of Schools Gary Maestas announced “with regret” that ”“effective immediately, Mr. Hanna will no longer be serving as principal of Plymouth South High School.

“This is a personnel matter and we are not able to share any further details at this time,” Maestas wrote in the letter. “We are working through a plan for the remainder of the school year and will communicate further once that is finalized.”

James Hanna, 48, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol and negligent driving and injury from mobile phone use Saturday after he was involved in a two-car crash on South Street.

Police said Hanna, the principal at Plymouth South High School since 2017, was intoxicated when he crashed his Jeep Grand Cherokee into the back of a Kia sedan near Mayflower Food and Spirits just after 6 p.m.

Hanna admitted to police that he looked down at his phone to look at a text when he crashed into the rear of the KIA. Neither Hanna nor the other driver was injured, but a passenger in the Kia was treated for whiplash.

Police reports indicate Hanna admitted to drinking three beers in the two hours before the crash.

Police reports state Hanna smelled moderately of alcohol, had glassy, blood-shot eyes and slurred speech and was unsteady on his feet after the crash. Reports indicate he failed field sobriety tests and had a blood/alcohol level that was more than twice the legal level for driving.

Breathalyzer tests taken at police headquarters recorded Hanna’s blood/alcohol level at .237 and .231 percent. The legal limit for driving is .08 percent.

Hanna could not be reached for comment by the newspaper. His attorney, Stephen Jones, declined to comment on the charges.

Hanna has spent more than half of his life as a teacher and administrator at Plymouth South High School. He was principal of the school’s technical studies program before his appointment as principal at Plymouth South in May 2017.

 

Fatal overdose in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A local man has died in what police are calling a fatal drug overdose.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the 36-year-old man was found unresponsive in the living room of his home in North Plymouth Friday morning. Efforts to revive the man were not successful.

Manuel said police have deemed the man’s death a fatal overdose based on investigation. The man’s death is the first fatal overdose in Plymouth in 2020.

 

Plymouth North Students Face Attempted Arson Charges

Two 15-year-old boys will face criminal charges for performing a viral online prank that used a phone charger and a penny to short-circuit electrical outlets at their school.

PLYMOUTH – Two 15-year-old boys will face criminal charges for performing a viral online prank that used a phone charger and a penny to short-circuit electrical outlets at their school.

Police Chief Michael Botieri said the Plymouth North High School students each will be charged with two felony counts of attempted arson and two misdemeanor counts of malicious destruction of property less than $1,200 in connection with the so-called TikTok challenge.

“This type of behavior will not be tolerated by this department and anyone involved will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law,” Botieri said in a statement.

The charges stem from two separate incidents in which the two students fused a penny to the prongs of charger in classrooms at the school. The prank, which involves sliding a penny down onto the prongs of a partially inserted phone charger, has gone viral on the popular video app, TikTok.

Police and firefighters were called to Plymouth North shortly after noon Tuesday after a teacher reported that two students had performed the dangerous challenge twice in a matter of minutes in a back corner of the classroom.

Firefighters found a scorched electrical outlet and a penny fused to the blacked prongs of a charger.

Botieri said the boys face two counts of each charge because an investigation revealed the same boys had performed the prank on an earlier occasion, but it went unnoticed. The criminal charges were to be filed Friday in Juvenile Court.

Superintendent of Schools Gary Maestas could not comment on whether the students are facing disciplinary action in school, but he issued a statement saying the school district is working with the police and fire departments “to fully understand the scope of the issue and pursue charges to the fullest extent of the law.”

Maestas called the pranks irresponsible, noting that it has ignited fires in other schools in Massachusetts and others states, causing disruption of the school day and significant damage to schools.

Fire Chief Ed Bradley said firefighters investigated and confirmed that there was no fire in the classroom and the room was safe. Nobody was injured in the incidents, but Bradley said the prank involves a significant risk or injury and damage.

“These actions are extremely dangerous and could potentially start a fire and cause thousands of dollars in property damage. It could also cause serious injury to anyone who is nearby,” Brady said in a statement. “Luckily, no one was hurt today, but we urge parents to talk to their children about this troubling trend and tell them ow dangerous it is to themselves and others.”

According to the state fire marshal, there have been two other confirmed instances of the TikTok prank in Massachusetts recently. One occurred at a residence in Holden. The other occurred at Westford High School, where the students responsible will also face charges.

Bradley said the state fire marshal sent out an advisory about the incidents in Holden and Westford late Tuesday morning. The incidents at Plymouth North occurred less than 30 minutes later.

Plymouth Students Face Charges After Prank Goes Viral

PLYMOUTH — Two Plymouth North High School students are facing charges after performing an internet video prank that went viral.

The students were caught performing the prank after they scorched two electrical outlets in a classroom Tuesday using a penny and a phone charger.

Plymouth firefighters were called to the school at about 12:15 p.m. and found the pronged part of an iPhone charger that had been blackened and scorched. A penny was fused to the prongs of the charger, and an electrical outlet in the back corner of the room was scorched.

A teacher told firefighters that the students had plugged the charger in and dropped a penny between the outlet and the charger, causing the outlet to spark and smoke. The teacher said the students had done it twice in a matter of minutes in the classroom.

Firefighters found there was no fire in the classroom, which was deemed to be safe. No one was injured, according to officials. The Plymouth North students face charges of burning a building, property destruction and disorderly conduct, as well as additional school discipline. The Plymouth Police Department and the State Fire Marshal’s Office were notified and are investigating.

Videos of the prank have been posted on the smartphone micro-video app TikTok. The prank involves partially inserting the pronged part of a phone charger into an outlet and sliding a penny down the wall onto the exposed prongs. This action results in the outlet being scorched and can cause electrical system damage and, in some cases, fire, according to the State Fire Marshal’s Office.

The office said the Plymouth incident is at least the third time this prank has caused damage in the state.

A student at Westford Academy started a fire inside the school Friday, forcing an evacuation, and is facing charges. Another incident happened at a home in Holden.

The Norfolk County Fire Chiefs Association and State Fire Marshal Peter Ostroskey are warning parents to discourage their children from trying the prank.

“Alert them to this challenge, advise them to, not only look for signs of fire play like scorched outlets, but to have conversations about fire and electrical safety with tweens and teenagers,” Ostroskey said in a statement.

Material from WCVB was used in this report.

 

New Badge of Honor For Plymouth Police

Local police are sporting new badges to mark the town’s 400th anniversary.

PLYMOUTH – Local police are sporting new badges to mark the town’s 400th anniversary.

As part of the 2020 commemoration of the landing of the Pilgrims, all 128 sworn officers on the force are wearing special commemorative badges designed to reflect the town’s long and rich history.

Chief Michael Botieri distributed the new commemorative badges to officers as 2019 ended. By the chief’s order, the new badges are part of the official Plymouth Police Department uniform until 2021.

The badges replace shell-style badges that local police have been using since at least the 1940s.

The commemorative badges are based on badges local officers wore more than 100 years ago. There is one major difference. Instead of badge numbers, the new badges will have the years 1620-2020 etched in the lower right corner.

Patrolmen will wear silver badges. Ranking officers and detectives will wear gold shields.

The badges were designed using the badge that belonged to former local police officer Jacob “Happy” Peck, who served on the department from 1915 to 1941.

Botieri said he wanted his officers to feel they are a part of the year-long commemoration as they will be involved in virtually every event.

“There will be no department in town affected more by 2020 than the Police Department,” Botieri said. “I think it personalizes it a little bit for the year. We want them to enjoy the celebration and be part of the celebration.”

Botieri said officers will return to using their old shell-style badges in 2021.

 

PCO To Participate in Mentoring

PLYMOUTH — The police chiefs of Plymouth County announced that Plymouth County Outreach has been selected as a mentor site for the TASC’s Center for Health and Justice’s Law Enforcement/First Responder Diversion and Referral Mentoring Initiative.

PCO will serve as a mentor to other law enforcement and first responder agencies across the country in their efforts to respond to the opioid crisis.

Mentor sites were selected through a competitive process to participate in the program, which will fund peer-to-peer site visit opportunities for law enforcement and first responder agencies to visit mentor agencies. The eight sites represent a diverse cross-section of diversion programs and collaborations between law enforcement and first responders, behavioral health providers, and other community partners to connect individuals with opioid use disorder to treatment, instead of entering the criminal justice system.

Plymouth County Outreach is one of eight jurisdictions that will participate in this initiative. Other counties include: Cabell County Emergency Management Services in West Virginia, Colerain Township Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services in Ohio, Lucas County Sheriff’s Office in Ohio, Mundelein Police Department in Illinois, the city of Philadelphia, Seattle-King County Public Defender Association in Washington and the Tucson Police Department.

Visit http://coapresources.org/Learning/PeerToPeer/Diversion for more information about the Law Enforcement/First Responder Diversion and Referral Mentoring Initiative.

 

State Fire Marshall – Plymouth Police Investigate Homemade Bomb

PLYMOUTH — Plymouth police are awaiting lab testing results from an improvised explosive that a Buttermilk Bay man found along his fence Sunday.

Plymouth police Capt. Kevin Manuel the resident was taking decorations off his fence when he saw the device on the ground. He said the explosive was a homemade device but would not elaborate.

“It’s very weird, especially since the guy claims no one has any reason to do this,” Manuel said.

The device was handed over to the state fire marshal’s office. Spokeswoman Jennifer Mieth said the device was not commercially produced.

“It appears to have been improvised,” she said. “It was taken to the State Police crime lab.”

She said the state fire marshal’s office is assisting in the investigation.

Plymouth police is the primary organization investigating while the state fire marshal’s office is investigating the device itself, he said.

“At this point, they have the evidence and they’re processing it,” Manuel said.

 

Police are investigating explosives outside a home in Buttermilk Bay.

PLYMOUTH – Police are investigating the discovery of explosives outside a home in Buttermilk Bay.

A man removing his outdoor Christmas lights discovered the device Sunday morning. Capt. Kevin Manuel said the resident reported finding what appeared to be two sticks of dynamite.

Manuel said the explosive appears to be a homemade device. It was located just outside the wooden fence around the man’s home.

Members of the State Police bomb squad neutralized the device. State Police as well as members of the State Fire Marshal’s office are investigating.

 

December 2019

Plymouth Man Accused of  Business Beak-in

PLYMOUTH — A 23-year-old Plymouth man was arrested on Christmas Eve after police say he broke into Turf N Surf Marine on State Road and stole several items.

James P. Holmes Jr. was arraigned on Thursday in Plymouth District Court on charges of breaking and entering in the night time, possession of a burglary tool, attempting to commit a crime, two counts of vandalizing property and four counts of larceny from a building. He was released on $250 bail and is due back in court on Jan. 7.

Police said Holmes broke into the business on Tuesday some time between 4 and 5 a.m. and stole wallets, cash and personal items from a building at the boat storage facility. Police arrested Holmes at his home on Sachem Road just before noon.

 

Driver Facing Heroin Charges After Traffic Stop in South Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police arrested a local man on drug charges Thursday evening after finding packets of heroin in his vehicle after a traffic complaint in South Plymouth.

Steven Bedard, 29, of 105 South Meadow Road, was charged with driving under the influence of drugs, possession of a Class A substance with intent to distribute, possession of a Class A substance as a subsequent offense, negligent driving and driving after suspension.

Lt. Jason Higgins said police found Bedard’s vehicle idling in the middle of Martingale Lane after residents reported seeing the vehicle traveling erratically through the neighborhood.

Higgins said officers found Bedard shirtless and screaming at himself behind the wheel of the car.

An investigation determined Bedard was under the influence of drugs. An inventory of the vehicle revealed numerous packets of heroin, packaging materials consistent with street-level drug dealing and a large sum of cash.

 

Halifax Woman Accused of Armed Robbery

PLYMOUTH – Police accused a Halifax woman of armed robbery Thursday after an incident involving prescription medication and a box cutter in North Plymouth.

Lisa Leblanc, 43, of 333 Twin Lakes Drive, Halifax, was also charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, threatening to commit murder and assault and battery.

Lt. Jason Higgins said police arrested Leblanc at an acquaintance’s house on Court Street Thursday night. She man told police she head-butted him and threatened to kill him with a box cutter while demanding prescription medication.

 

Minor Earthquake Shakes Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Ann Luongo heard the boom, but didn’t think much of it until social media erupted with alerts.

The noise explosion that the Manomet resident thought was the rumble of a truck out on State Road Tuesday evening was actually the sound of a small earthquake erupting miles to the north.

A quake, measured at 2.1 magnitude, occurred at 5:29:26 p.m. and was centered 1.1 miles SSW of North Plymouth. According to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, the quake occurred about five miles underground at 41.957N, 70.692W.

Fire Chief Ed Bradley said the geographic coordinates mark a spot at Armstrong and Apollo 11 roads in the Plymouth Industrial Park.

Bradley said his departments did not receive any calls regarding the quake, but police did take a few from residents of Manomet.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said one man person reporting hearing a loud explosion. A couple of others reported having dishes rattle, but no damage or injuries were reported.

The quake was not felt at Pilgrim Station and did not cause any seismic alarms to register at the recently closed nuclear power plant, but Patrick O’Brien, communications manager for Comprehensive Decommissioning International, said the plant entered an earthquake procedure after being made aware of the event. O’Brien said the plant followed and exited the procedure shortly thereafter.

“If we had received seismic alarms or it was felt on site addition measure would have been taken, as always we have a robust emergency plan that incorporates all types of potential scenarios including an earthquake,” O’Brien wrote in an email.

Bradley noted the quake is at least the third minor quake in the region since last summer. Another smaller quake occurred in Rhode Island last week. In August, a magnitude 2.0 quake occurred in the Wareham/Onset area. “It seems like it’s a little more active than I remember, but maybe little ones like that always happen,” he said.

 

Plymouth Police Raise Money By Not Shaving

PLYMOUTH – Local police are sporting a scruffier look this fall. And it will extend into winter.

The department’s no Shave November will extend through December as well, as the force doubles down on its fundraising efforts for veterans and substance abuse victims.

Chief Michael Bortieri and 74 of his fellow officers haven’t shaved since Halloween as part of the fundraiser, which benefits Home Base and Plymouth County Outreach.

Officers participating in the program each donated $100 to one of the two charities in exchange for permission to skirt customary restrictions on facial hair. The 75 officers represent 60 percent of Plymouth’s 125-man department.

So many officers participated that Botieri agreed to extend the program for a second month at the reduced rate of $50 per man.

The campaign has raised $7,500 locally in just the one month.

The No Shave program has raised $470,000 for Home Base since the fundraiser started five years ago. Local officers are splitting their donations between that charity, which help veterans and families impacted by invisible wounds, such as port-traumatic street or traumatic brain injury, and Plymouth County Outreach, which works to battle drug addiction.

 

Plymouth Accountant Charged With Stealing From Retirement Board

PLYMOUTH – Police have accused the Plymouth County Retirement Association’s former accountant of stealing money from the fund.

Paul Hurley, 57, of 19 Brentwood Circle, was arrested Friday on warrants charging him with larceny of more than $1,200 by singe scheme and seven counts of uttering a false check.

The charges stem from allegations that Hurley reprinted already issued retirement checks for seven county retirees and signed and deposited them in his own account. Between August 2018 and last July, Hurley is accused of stealing $16,367.34 via the check scheme.

Hurley was also arrested Friday on a warrant charging larceny of less than $1,200 in connection with small thefts from Walmart that while he was working for the store last summer. On multiple occasions between July and September, Hurley allegedly stole items from the store at the end of work shifts.

Officials of the county retirement association went to police in July after they were contacted by bank officials about seven suspicious checks.

According to court records, an investigation revealed Hurley reprinted checks for seven former county employees who receive retirement benefits via direct deposit. He allegedly signed and deposited the reprinted checks in his own account at Eastern Bank.

Police affidavits attached to the court file state that Hurley was positively identified depositing the checks on ATM video at banks in Plymouth and Kingston.

County retirement board officials confronted Hurley about the checks in July. He later went to work at Walmart, where he is accused of taking items totaling $280.31 without paying for them at the end of his work shifts.

Court records indicate Hurley admitted to taking about $400 worth of goods from the store, saying the loss of his previous position led to hard times.

The warrants for Hurley’s arrest were issued last week, after he failed to answer a summons to appear in court on the charges. He was held over the weekend and arraigned Monday morning in District Court. He was being held on $500 bail. The case was continued to Dec. 17 for a pretrial conference.

 

Plymouth Man Held Without Bail in Apartment Shooting

PLYMOUTH — A Plymouth man wanted in connection with an October shooting at a housing complex is being held without bail after police say he and two other men led officers on a chase up the South Shore that ended in Braintree on Tuesday.

Melik Harrison, 20, of Algonquin Terrace, was arraigned Wednesday in Plymouth District Court on charges of illegally carrying a firearm, illegally possessing ammunition and disorderly conduct. He is due back in court Dec. 2 for a detention hearing.

Police said Harrison and seven others were involved in an Oct. 16 shooting at the Algonquin Heights apartment complex where Harrison lives. According to a police report filed in Plymouth District Court, two groups got into an altercation that led to at least two people firing guns and several others, including Harrison, taking cover.

Harrison and 25-year-old Siron Cromwell-Harrison were each seen brandishing a handgun during the altercation and leaving their guns in two separate cars before leaving the area, police said. Cromwell-Harrison, who police said fired some of the shots, was arrested on firearms charges shortly after the shooting.

A woman who was driving one of the cars that Harrison and Cromwell-Harrison placed their guns in, 37-year-old Schericia Barber, was also arrested on firearms charges shortly after.

Well over a month later on Tuesday, police captured Harrison in Braintree around 4 p.m. after a two-hour chase that was initiated by State Police in Plymouth.

Harrison and two other men from Boston — 25-year-old Dennis Ortiz and 25-year-old Matthew Gardner-Toney — abandoned their car on Allen Street in Braintree and fled on foot, drawing a swarm of police officers and a SWAT team to an area near Weymouth Landing and East Braintree.

A State Police helicopter and dogs were involved in the search while Braintree High School and other nearby schools delayed dismissal. Trains on the Greenbush commuter rail line were paused as police searched the tracks. Service resumed around 4 p.m.

All three men were charged with trespassing on a railroad track. Ortiz was released after posting $300 bail while Gardner-Toney was released after promising to appear in court for his arraignment. Harrison was initially held on $50,000 bail.

Police reports name a fourth suspect wanted in connection with the shooting who has not yet been arrested.

Joe DiFazio, jdfiazio@patriotledger.com, and Shaun Robinson, srobinson@patriotledger.com, contributed to this story.

 

November 2019

October 2019

A hang glider escaped injury after crashing into a tree

PLYMOUTH – A hang glider escaped injury after crashing into a tree in Cedarville Saturday. Police said the 34 year-old Brookline man crashed into a tree near 81 Sanderson Drive at 3:48 p.m. Firefighters reported finding the man about 30 feet up in a tree. The man told firefighters he was not injured. Firefighters called in Tower One and used the ladder truck to cut a path to the man and free him from the branches. The man was examined and cleared by paramedics at the scene.

Plymouth Police Chief Proposes Retired Officers to Work Traffic Details.

PLYMOUTH – Retired local police officers may want to dust off their uniforms under a proposal to staff traffic details around town.

Under a plan proposed by Chief Michael Botieri, retired officers would be allowed to work the traffic details as special police officers.

It’s a way of life in many surrounding towns, and town officials say it is necessary to man all the traffic projects underway in town. Town Meeting will consider the proposal Saturday.

Botieri said the department is having difficulty staffing road details because there are so many projects in the works in preparation for the town’s 400th anniversary celebration next year.

Younger officers on the force are not as willing as veterans to work overtime hours on details, he said. As a result, the town has had to turn to outside agencies for help in staffing details.

If local police cannot man the shifts, the department currently turns to the Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department, State Police and police departments from surrounding towns.

Local officers would still be the first choice for local details. The special officers would simply be another alternative.

“We haven’t had the need before,” Boteiri said. “We just need officers to work. The younger officers in the last few years don’t want to work more than 40 hours, so it has become very difficult to cover jobs.

“With all the work coming up for 2020 and even past 2020, just day-to-day details, we’re having a a hard time filling. We’ve had days where we’ve been unable to fill work schedules and people need to do the work on the roads. This will give us another pool to go to.”

Botieri said selectmen or the chief of police in most surrounding towns authorize retirees to work on details as special officers. Town counsel wanted Town Meeting to make the decision.

Under the proposal, the special officers would have to have retired in good standing and not as a result of an injury. The special officers would also need to pass fitness requirements, provide their own equipment and follow the rules and regulations of Plymouth police officers. Special officer would also have to be younger than 65.

Botieri said the move would carry no cost to the town and have no effect on the budget.

Search Continues For Shooters

Residents and businesses around Samoset Street were urged to shelter in place, and nearby schools went into partial lock down after the Wednesday morning shooting.

PLYMOUTH – Police have arrested two people in connection with a shooting Wednesday at the Algonquin Heights apartment complex.

Chief Michael Botieri said officers also recovered two guns and are actively looking for other suspects.

Schericia Barber, 37, of 1 Algonquin Terrace, Apt. L10, was charged with carrying a firearm without a license, possession of ammunition with an FID card, carrying a large capacity firearm in a vehicle and carrying a firearm without a license. Botieri said the charges stem from the recovery of two weapons from a vehicle seized from the scene of the shooting.

Siron Cromwell-Harrison, a 25-year-old homeless man, was charged with disorderly conduct, unlawful possession of a firearm and committing a firearm violation with one prior violent or drug-related crime. Botieri said Cromwell-Harrison is accused of being one of the people who fired shots during Wednesday morning’s shooting in a parking lot at the apartment complex off Samoset Street.

Police said multiple shots were fired in an exchange of gunfire between two rival groups, but no injuries were reported.

Botieri said police believe as many as eight people may have been involved in the confrontation. Police recovered a third gun inside nearby Walgreen’s pharmacy, on Samoset Street, shortly after the shooting.

Police detained another man in connection with the shooting Wednesday afternoon in a nearby condominium complex. The 35-year-old man was seen running from Algonquin Heights to a nearby condominium complex on Marc Drive. He surrendered to members of a regional SWAT team after a three-hours standoff, but police later released him after determining he was at the scene of the shooting, but not involved.

Botieri said police are “very confident” that everyone connected with the shooting will be brought to justice.

Police used reverse 911 calls to advise area residents they were searching for a shooter and warned people to shelter in place Wednesday morning.

Seven local schools – Plymouth North High School, Plymouth Community Intermediate School and Hedge, West, Cold Spring, Nathaniel Morton and Federal Furnace elementary schools – also went into “shelter in place” mode. Teachers were told to continue lessons, but not leave their rooms. No one was allowed in or out of the schools during the stay in place order.

The shooting and subsequent investigation delayed school dismissals throughout the district by 30 minutes.

Some businesses, including several in the industrial park that backs up to Algonquin Heights, took the shelter in place advisory to heart and shut down until the order was lifted at 2:30 p.m.

Residents of the condominiums on Marc Drive may have been the most impacted. With tactical vehicles and dozens of heavily armed police officers in the neighborhood, they were told to stay in their homes and not answer the door unless police came knocking.

Some like Chris Ricciuti, had to wait it out behind police lines.

Riccioti, who owns two condominiums in The Groves, arrived from Woburn to patch some holes in ceilings just as police shut down the complex. A friend told him there might be more holes to patch before it was all over, but the standoff ended peacefully.

Attempted Kidnapping in South Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police accused a South Plymouth man of trying to drag two teenaged girls into woods near their neighborhood Friday.

Jeffrey Lennon, 42, of 93 Lake View Boulevard, was charged with attempted kidnapping, attempted kidnapping of a child, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct, vandalizing property and two counts of assault and battery.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said police were called to Lake View Boulevard at 3:37 p.m. after getting calls that Lennon tried to pull an 18-year-old woman and then a 13-year-old girl into woods near their homes. Both girls escaped and ran to a home for help.

Manuel said it appeared Lennon was under the influence of some type of substance. Police found him pacing in the neighborhood. He is accused of banging the hood of a cruiser when the first officer arrived. Manuel said it took four officers to place Lennon in custody.

 

Local police are going pink in October to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the public is invited to them in.

Plymouth Police Going Pink in October

PLYMOUTH – Local police are going pink in October to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the public is invited to them in.

Throughout the month, uniformed personnel are allowed to replace their standard shoulder patch with the Plymouth Police Pink Patch as a reminder of the department’s commitment to raising awareness about the disease.

More than 150 public safety agencies nationwide have partnered for the pink patch project, which raises funds through the sale of pink police patches. The goal is to increase education about the importance of early detection and prevention in the fight against breast cancer and to support breast cancer patients and research organizations in combating the disease.

Each public safety agency in the program has partnered with a local cancer research organization or support group. Plymouth police have partnered with the Norwell Visiting Nurse Association’s Breast Cancer Support Program.

Proceeds from the sale of patches will go directly to the NVNA’s Breast Cancer Support Program to provide services to families from Plymouth and throughout the South Shore.

The patches are $10 each and be purchased anytime at the Plymouth police headquarters, 20 Long Pond Road, Plymouth, MA 02360 (checks or money orders only – payable to Norwell Visiting Nurse Association). Patches can also be purchased online at www.plymouthpolice.com.

Coffee With a Cop: Police Make New Friends

PLYMOUTH – Customers may have wondered if they were getting fries with their morning brew Wednesday as Plymouth police hosted Coffee with a Cop Day at a local Dunkin’.

While fellow officers distributed coffee and doughnuts to customers inside the Samoset Street shop Wednesday morning, Chief Michael Botieri had some fun with folks using the drive-through window.

“Good morning, welcome to McDonald’s,” the chief joked through a headset as customers placed orders. “Would you like cream with that? Extra onions?”

The Coffee with a Cop Day, now in its third year nationwide, is designed to help law enforcement engage with the public. The open invitation promised no agenda, no speeches, no presentations, just coffee and a chance to ask questions, voice concerns and get to know officers in the community.

Dunkin’ reached out to police in several area communities to host this year’s event, which ran from 8 to 10 a.m.

Young Jayc Figueroa was one of the first to greet officers.

The second-grader at Nathaniel Morton Elementary School hopes to become a cop and went to work with his mother, Dunkin’ employee Kelly Amaral, to meet officers on the force before school.

Botieri and several officers posed for a photo with Jayc and gave him a police pin and commemorative coin. Better still, Officer Paul Reissfelder also gave Jayc a ride to school in his cruiser.

About 40 people stopped by for coffee and many of those stayed long enough to share their thoughts.

said some talked about what is going on in the country, asking questions about training and events involving police in other parts of the country. “A few said this is good because there’s a negative perception about police and this can only help,” Botieri said.

Cathy Rhear, district manager for Dunkin’, said Botieri and his officers certainly helped dispel that perception among her staff, even if it did mean giving away a few free meals.

“We’re definitely loving him behind the counter. The crew has been in great spirits all day,” Rhear said.

Pam White, the store manager, said she will try to get the chief to work the busy Sunday morning shift. “He’s having too much fun,” she said.

Botieri surprised every fifth customer at the drive through with free drinks and got a few surprises of his own.

One woman confessed that her registration sticker looked expired, but she had the current one in her glove box and would make the switch right away. “I had to tell her this about free coffee, not her registration,” Botieri said.

The next customer reported that the car that just left had an expired registration.

This year’s Coffee with a Cop ended with the chief offering to make a coffee run to a rival shop. “Who wants Marylou’s,” he said.

 

September 2019

Recruits Join Plymouth Police and Fire Departments

The local police and fire departments have seen increases in their ranks with recent graduations from training academies.

PLYMOUTH – The local police and fire departments have seen increases in their ranks with recent graduations from training academies.

Ten new police officers joined the force Aug. 30 after graduating from Plymouth Police Academy’s 67th Recruit Officer Course.

The new officers are Nicholas Anderson, Nicholas Ault, James Burke, Kelsey Gailes, Derek George, Richard Geuevremont, Michael Golden, Cory Perkins, Paul Reissfelder and Brendan Rix.

Ten new local firefighters graduated last Friday, Sept 13, from the 276th class of the Massachusetts Firefighter Academy.

The new firefighters are Shawn Coburn, Stephen Corbo, Stefan Cyr, Joshua Daubert, Joseph Flynn, Joseph Galofaro, Steven Harrington, Tabor Rossi, Bryan Trefry and Michael Weymouth.

Woman Indicted in Stabbing

PLYMOUTH — A Plymouth County grand jury has indicted a Plymouth woman accused of stabbing two neighbors over an argument about a children’s slide.

The indictments charge Courtney Massey with armed assault to murder, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon causing serious bodily injury and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Massey was arrested in June after police received a report about two women, ages 22 and 36, who had been stabbed at an affordable housing complex on Algonquin Terrace following a fight about the use of a children’s slide, according to a police report on file in Plymouth District Court.

A resident told police she’d been playing with her son on a slide outside the complex when Massey came home from walking her dogs. The woman told police Massey started yelling at her for using her slide, so she told her she would put it back and not use it anymore.

A friend of the woman using the slide confronted Massey at her apartment, and Massey stabbed her and eventually another woman, police said.

One of the victims was taken to Boston by helicopter for medical treatment.

The indictment transfers Massey’s case from District Court to Superior Court, where more serious cases are tried and defendants can face longer sentences if convicted. A Superior Court date has not been set for Massey.

 

Man Charged For Pulling Alarm at Pine Hills

PLYMOUTH – A 74-year-old local man will face charges for pulling a fire alarm that shut down a state Department of Public Utilities hearing at Plymouth South Middle School earlier this month.

Capt. Dana Flynn said police identified the man through video surveillance footage from the school. He has been issued a summons to appear in Plymouth District Court on charges of pulling a false fire alarm and disturbing the peace.

Police would not release the name of the man. He is accused of pulling the alarm that emptied the school’s auditorium during a heated and overcrowded hearing on proposed water rate increases in The Pinehills.

Flynn said the charges are misdemeanors. Disturbing the peace carries a fine of up to $150 for a first offense. The charge of pulling a false fire alarm carries a fine of $100 to $500 and up to a year in jail.

The town also will be seeking restitution for the cost of firefighters’ response to the alarm.

 

 

August 2019

 

Plymouth man sentenced to prison for raping 14-year-old girl

PLYMOUTH – A Superior Court jury has convicted a Plymouth man of raping a 14-year-old girl.

Greg Landry, 46, of Buttermilk Bay, was found guilty after a four-day trial Thursday on charges of aggravated rape and indecent assault and battery on a person 14 or older, District Attorney Timothy Cruz announced.

Superior Court Judge Jeffrey Locke sentenced Landry to serve 12 to 14 years in state prison Friday. Landry will be on probation for five years after completing the sentence.

As conditions of his probation, Landry was ordered to register as a sex offender, stay away from the victim and the victim’s family, submit to GPS monitoring and have no unsupervised physical contact with children under 18.

Plymouth police arrested Landry in June 2016 after a 14-year-old girl reported that Landry had raped her. As a result of the investigation, police seized Landry’s cellphone. A search revealed Landry had multiple images of child pornography on the phone.

Landry was scheduled to go on trial on a charge of possession of child pornography in October. He pleaded guilty to the charge Friday. Locke sentenced him to four to five years in prison on the charge. The sentence would run concurrent with the aggravated rape sentence.

Assistant District Attorney Vanessa Madge prosecuted the case.

 

Brothers injured in South Plymouth dirt bike crash

PLYMOUTH – Two brothers were injured in a dirt bike crash in South Plymouth Wednesday.

Police said the 19- and 22-year-old men were riding dirt bikes in a field behind Moraski Lane in the Ponds of Plymouth when they crashed just after 6:30 p.m.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the men live in the Ponds of Plymouth near the crash site. The injuries were not considered life threatening. Manuel said both men were able to talk to police after the crash. They were taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment. Environmental Police are investigating.

 

Plymouth man accused of torching his home is indicted

BROCKTON — A Plymouth County grand jury has indicted a Plymouth man accused of setting his own home on fire before leading police on a car chase.

The indictment charges Edgar Newell with arson to a home, negligent driving, failing to stop for police and resisting arrest. It also transfers Newell’s case from Plymouth District Court to Plymouth Superior Court, where more serious cases are prosecuted and defendants can face longer sentences if convicted. Newell has not yet been assigned a Superior Court arraignment date.

Plymouth police said they were called to Newell’s house in June by a neighbor who said the home was on fire and someone had just left in an SUV. Police said officers came across the SUV while heading to the fire, but the driver, later identified as Newell, would not stop for them.

Newell eventually drove back to his own street, parking in a neighbor’s driveway, police said.

The neighbor told police he was awakened by the sound of a fire alarm going off in Newell’s house and saw flames coming from a side window of the house. Police said Newell was the only person home at the time.

Investigators believe the fire started in the kitchen of the home and spread to the exterior and the second floor, according to police reports filed in court. Firefighters were able to put out the fire before it destroyed the home.

The police reports did not say why Newell would have set fire to his home.

 

Police break up underage drinking party in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Several local youths will face criminal charges after police broke up an underage drinking party off Rocky Hill Road early Tuesday.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said police found 11 young men and women, all local residents, consuming alcohol after responding to a complaint about a loud party on Tower Road just after midnight.

Manuel said 10 of the youths will receive summonses to answer charges of possession of alcohol by a minor in court. The 18-year-old male host of the party was arrested on charges of possession of alcohol by a minor and selling/delivering alcohol to a minor.

 

Aerial banner lands on house in South Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A South Plymouth residence was blanketed in advertising Saturday afternoon when an airplane lost a banner it had been towing around town.

PLYMOUTH – A South Plymouth residence was blanketed in advertising Saturday afternoon when an airplane lost a banner it had been towing around town.

The banner, which used large block letters to advertise an area business, was being towed by a plane from an airport on Cape Cod. The aerial banner came loose and fell onto the roof of an unattached outbuilding at a house on Halfway Pond Road shortly before 1 p.m.

No one was home when the banner landed. A neighbor reported seeing it fall. Firefighters used a 24-foot ladder to remove the banner without damage. Police confiscated the banner.

 

Woman stabbed at Plymouth apartment complex

PLYMOUTH – Police are investigating a stabbing at the Algonquin Heights apartment complex.

PLYMOUTH – Police are investigating a stabbing at the Algonquin Heights apartment complex.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a 30-year-old woman who lives in the apartment complex was stabbed in the chest shortly after 1:30 a.m. Friday.

Police learned of the stabbing when an officer stopped the woman’s car after she failed to stop for a stop sign while driving away from the apartments at 1:39 a.m. The woman explained that she was driving herself to the hospital because she had been stabbed.

Police called paramedics, who transported the woman to BID-Plymouth hospital. She was later airlifted to a Boston hospital for treatment. Chief Michael Botieri said the woman may have suffered a punctured lung.

Police were able to speak with the woman, but had not identified a suspect in the stabbing by Friday afternoon.

Plymouth Walmart locked down after bb gun scare

PLYMOUTH – The Walmart store at Colony Place went into lockdown early Tuesday after an employee spotted a man with a handgun in the store’s parking lot.

Police learned the weapon was actually a bb gun after tactically approaching and disarming the man. The gun was a very realistic looking replica of a 9mm Beretta, Lt. Jason Higgins said.

Higgins said the store manager called police and put the store in lockdown at 12:06 a.m. after an employee reported seeing the man kneeling in the passenger seat of a vehicle with the gun.

Higgins said several store employees were visibly shaken by the incident, which comes just days after a weekend shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas. The 45-year-old local man was charged with disturbing the peace as a subsequent offense.

 

Crash near Plymouth South High School claims 2015 grad

PLYMOUTH – A promising young man from South Plymouth died early Saturday in a fiery crash on Long Pond Road.

Jacob Sampson, 22, was killed when his 2018 Ford Fusion crashed into a tree just south of the entrance to Plymouth South High School.

Sampson, a 2015 graduate of Plymouth South, was the lone occupant of the vehicle.

Police said the 2 a.m crash broke the tree in half and separated the engine compartment from the passenger compartment of the vehicle. The car and several trees were on fire when firefighters arrived. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Sampson’s mother, Deanna Vogel, said her oldest son had a wicked sense of humor that was born of an early challenge in life, the loss of his hair, and would have seen some irony in his own demise.

Born five weeks premature in an April snowstorm, Sampson was racing to Boston in an ambulance when he was just a day old. “He came in with a bang and went out with a bang,” Vogel said.

Vogel said her son started losing his hair to a skin condition when he was just 4 and came to draw strength from it.

“It was heartbreaking because I knew it would make him different, but I hoped it would make him stronger and it really did,” Vogel said. “He just always made light of stuff.”

Vogel said her son especially enjoyed a quote attributed to comedian Robin Williams that says people are only given a little spark of madness in life and mustn’t lose it. He embraced his spark by acting a little crazy and pushing people a little out of their comfort zones.

Vogel said her son seemed to find himself after joining the football team at Plymouth South. He became stronger and more motivated, working harder for his coaches and teammates than seemingly possible.

Assistant Superintendent of Schools Patty Fry, the former principal at Plymouth South, said Sampson was respected by coaches and players alike as a great teammate and a great team player. Teachers and administrators, meanwhile, appreciated his commitment to the school and it inclusive culture.

“Everyone liked him. He was always the kid who had a smile on his face and was always involved in school community,” Fry said.

Sampson had been attending college since high school and also worked for his uncles at Main Street Sports Bar and Grill, where he was known as ‘the Mayor.’

“He could talk to anyone, could talk anyone down. He was so charismatic, so real. My hardest thing is that he was my best audience. We made each other laugh, and I don’t want to lose that spark,” Vogel said.

Longtime friend Justin Lamb said Sampson seemed destined for a successful career in sales and marketing.

“Honestly, wherever he was, everyone always had their eyes on him. He would light up a room when he walked in,” Lamb said. “He was everyone’s friend. He would hang out with everybody. He was just like a friend to the town. It’s just so tragic what happened.”

Plymouth Police Academy Alumni Association helps make Third of July a success

PLYMOUTH – Napoleon and Frederick the Great are both credited with saying an army runs of its stomach. Both military leaders would have had to be impressed with the firepower and provisioning at White Horse Beach on the Third of July.

A small army of first responders was on duty to make sure the annual bonfire and fireworks show did not get out of hand as the town got its early start on annual Independence Day festivities. And behind the police officers, sheriff’s deputies, firefighters and paramedics was the Plymouth Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association, a small but dedicated and growing group of men and women, young and old, who have completed one of the Plymouth Police Department’s Citizen Policing Academy programs.

While officers manned check points in and out of the more congested sections of the waterfront neighborhood, the alumni manned the grills and canteen – serving up hot refreshments and cold drinks to keep the team running.

“They don’t have the ability to break for dinner that evening, so it’s our pleasure to serve them one day a year, for the 365 days of the year they serve us,” Janet Tetreault, president of the alumni association, said.

A handful of alumni along with several people from Brook Retreat served up refreshments at the hospitality station at Taylor Avenue and Manomet Point Road. Just as important were the local businesses and organizations that donated funds and supplies for the evening.

This year’s sponsors were A.T.U. Local 1548, BJ’s Wholesale Club, Clements, Luke’s Liquors, Market Basket, Perry’s Market, Plymouth Rock Oyster Growers, Shaw’s, Stop and Shop, The Market at Pinehills, Twice the Ice and Walmart.

“On behalf of the Plymouth Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association, we would like to thank all who generously donated to make this event a great success,” Tetreault said.

Local woman seriously injured in weekend jet ski crash in South Plymout

PLYMOUTH – Friends asked for prayers and donations after a local woman was seriously injured Saturday in a jet ski accident in South Plymouth.

Talia Morini was airlifted to Boston Medical Center Saturday afternoon after the crash on White Island Pond. Officials credited an off-duty firefighter with saving the woman’s life after the operators of the two jet skis involved fled the scene.

Police Capt. Dana Flynn said the 19-year-old local woman was a passenger on one of the jet skis and was left to fend for herself after the two jet skis collided about 100 yards off shore at 4:08 p.m. An off-duty Milton firefighter who was at a home nearby heard the crash and took his boat into the pond to save the woman.

A longtime friend identified the crash victim as Morini, a 2018 graduate of Plymouth North High School.

“Right now, she needs all the prayers she can get. She’s doing OK, but it’s going to be a long road to recovery for her,” Emily Trepanier, a friend and former classmate, said.

Trepanier has organized a gofundme page to support Morini and her family and help with future medical expenses. By Monday night, the account had raised more than $9,200.

Trepanier said Morini was with friends at the pond Saturday, but details of what happened are still the subject of investigation. “She was left floating, unconscious. Luckily she had a life jacket on. An off-duty firefighter heard the crash and found her,” Trepanier said.

Flynn said the Good Samaritan was a firefighter from Milton, who rendered aid after using his pontoon boat to rescue Morini from the water.

Flynn said Morini was a passenger and riding in front of the jet ski driver. Both jet skiers fled after the crash, he said.

Harbormaster Chad Hunter said his crews arrived 20 minutes after the crash was reported and began searching the pond that straddles the Plymouth/Wareham town line for the jet skis. The Wareham harbormaster helped with the search.

Hunter said witnesses described the jet skis as red and white. One was more red and the other was more white. A search of the entire shoreline, including coves that extend into Wareham, revealed no signs of anything matching either machine, he said.

Hunter said officials believe the jet skis were together and the two operators had been fooling around and spraying each other with water when the crash occurred. “It’s probably one of the most dangerous things you can do on a jet ski – speed toward each other and then at the last minute turn and spray. We’ve seen a number of accidents,” Hunter said.

The accident is being investigated by Environmental Police. Spokesman Katie Gronendyke confirmed that a woman was taken to a hospital for care after she was injured in an accident involving two jet skis on White Island Pond. Gronendyke said Plymouth police and the harbormaster were on scene and that Environmental police are investigating.

“Due to the ongoing investigation, we are unable to provide any further information at this time,” Gronendyke said.

 

July 2019

Police arrest North Plymouth couple after fentanyl investigation

PLYMOUTH – Police arrested two North Plymouth residents on drug charges Thursday after an investigation into the distribution of fentanyl.

Melissa Cartolano, 31, and Jay Fratus, 32, of 18 Peck Ave., were charged after a 2:31 p.m. search of their house on charges of conspiracy to violate drug laws, possession of Class A drug (fentanyl) with intent to distribute, possession of a Class A drug (fentanyl), possession of a Class C drug (clonazepam) and two counts of possession of a Class B drug (oxycodone and buprenorphine).

Cartolano’s drug charges were subsequent offenses. She was also charged with possession of a Class B drug (amphetamine).

Capt. Kevin Manuel said narcotics detectives secured a warrant to search the couple’s home and car after a months-long investigation into the sale of fentanyl. Manuel said police seized drugs with an approximate street value of $1,500 as well as $5,000 in cash and drug paraphernalia and packaging material.

 

Overdose spikes in Plymouth area lead to warnings

PLYMOUTH – Police have issued warnings and offered assistance after a recent spike in drug overdoses, including three local fatalities over a three-day span.

Chief Michael Botieri said two of the three overdoses occurred on the Fourth of July. The third occurred on Tuesday, July 2. One person also died of an overdose in Wareham last Tuesday, and another person died of an apparent overdose in Carver on Friday.

In addition, seven other people survived overdoses with the help of Narcan, the opioid-reversing drug, including a woman who was found unresponsive Thursday morning in North Plymouth. She was revived by a police officer working a parade detail. Another officer revived a different woman when she collapsed from an overdose while talking to him on a downtown street last weekend.

Botieri said police do not think the overdoses are connected, beyond that all likely having the synthetic drug fentanyl at the root of the problem.

“Is it a bad batch of something? It could be, but we don’t think that’s the case here,” he said. “It doesn’t look like that. Could it be the holiday weekend? We don’t know. We just want to use the opportunity to highlight the fact that the epidemic still exists and arm people with information.”

Police said the three local fatalities occurred in different parts of town. A 28-year-old Holbrook man died after suffering an apparent overdose at a family cottage in South Plymouth July 2. Police believe the man ingested cocaine.

A 30-year-old man was found dead at his family home in South Plymouth Thursday morning. Police believe he had been mixing alcohol and prescription medication. A 28-year-old man died after he was found unresponsive by a roommate at his home later Thursday morning. A roommate told police he thought the man had used heroin, but officers found no evidence of the drug.

Botieri said police have been finding fentanyl, a more powerful, synthetic opiate, in a variety of substances for some time.

“It’s really been a game changer for us,” he said. “Over the past couple of years, probably all of the overdose reversals we’re getting with Narcan are fentanyl-based. There’s very little heroin out there anymore. It’s all some form of fentanyl. You just never know where it’s going show up. They’re putting it in everything, putting it in marijuana. You don’t know what you’re getting.”

The three Plymouth deaths bring to 15 the number of people who have died of suspected drug overdoses in town in 2019. Police reported 12 overdose deaths locally in 2018.

Plymouth County Outreach, a collaborative of county law enforcement departments aimed at making treatment more accessible to individuals with substance use disorders, issued an alert in response to the recent spike in overdoses. The alert seeks to help people – especially those at risk of overdose, as well as their families and friends – recognize the signs of overdose.

They include slow, shallow or erratic breathing; a very pale face; cool, clammy skin; choking or gagging sounds; slow, erratic or stopped pulse; blue-gray skin, usually at the lips and fingers first and sometimes at the tops of the ears; loss of consciousness; and limpness of the body.

Botieri, who helped found Plymouth County Outreach in response to the opioid crisis, said drug users and their family and friends can contact the PCO for different types of help.

Outeach teams stand ready to help families get overdose education and Narcan rescue kits. They can also help get a user into treatment.

Once contacted about someone at risk, PCO will visit the user with a team of plain-clothes police officers and certified recovery coaches in an effort to get the user into treatment.

PCO can also help people get Narcan, which saved lives 95 percent of the time it was administered in Plymouth County last year. The drug is available to the public at local pharmacies at the cost of a regular prescription co-pay. It is also available at drop-in centers.

Plymouth County Outreach partners with a variety of agencies to help users get help. Treatment, support and hope are also available at drop-in centers and recovery centers. To learn more or contact Plymouth County Outreach to access treatment, call any police department in the county (508-830-4218 in Plymouth) or visit www.plymouthcountyoutreach.org.

 

Plymouth among towns to see recent spike in drug overdoses

PLYMOUTH — Three Plymouth County towns saw 10 suspected drug overdose, half of them fatal, in a one-week period that included the Fourth of July holiday.

The overdoses in Plymouth, Carver and Wareham occurred between Saturday, June 29, and Saturday, July 6. Plymouth County Outreach, a South Shore coalition of law enforcement and health care providers fighting opioid abuse, said that number was higher than usual for the area, which had recently seen a decline in fatal overdoses.

The most recent fatal overdose data for Plymouth County showed deaths dropping for the second year in a row in 2018, according to the district attorney’s office. State Police detectives responded to 112 fatal overdoses in Plymouth County last year, 26 fewer than in 2017.

In a May report, state officials highlighted “particularly notable declines in some pockets of the state,” including across Plymouth County.

Last year marked the fourth year since the formation of the Plymouth County Outreach, a collaboration between the district attorney, Plymouth County sheriff’s office and 27 local police departments. Overdose deaths rose between 2015, the year the task force was formed, and 2016, but have been on the decline the last two years. Since the year 2000, 1,368 people have died from drug overdoses in Plymouth County.

The coalition encourages people to learn about the the signs of an overdose, including slow and shallow breathing, pale and clammy skin, choking or gurgling sounds, slow or erratic heartbeat and loss of consciousness. Anyone who believes someone is at risk of an overdose can contact Plymouth Police outreach teams at 508-830-4218.

 

Detective Lt. Tony Gomes retires 32 years on police force

PLYMOUTH – A special guest dropped in as Detective Lt. Tony Gomes retired after serving 32 years with the local police department Monday.

Watching with approval with was Tony Gomes Sr., the 97-year-old former director of veterans services, who knows a little bit about 30-year careers.

The elder Gomes retired in 2002 after 30 years as the town’s veterans agent. He became a member of the 30/30 Club two years later, when he stepped down after 30 years on the Plymouth Housing Authority.

“I did 32 years, but I’m not doing 30 more,” the younger Gomes said, during a reception at police headquarters.

Tony Jr. followed an unlikely path to police work, despite telling classmates he planned to be an officer in his high school yearbook. He went to Northeastern University to study accounting instead, but landed a job at the sheriff’s department and then Pilgrim Station as a security guard after school. He was one of several officers who joined the department during an expansion in 1987.

Gomes spent 14 years as a patrolman and still has a photograph that ran on the front of the Old Colony Memorial in the late 1990s of him running a radar patrol near Plymouth Country Club. Gomes became a sergeant in 2001 and a lieutenant six years later.

He was appointed as detective lieutenant in charge of the detective bureau in January 2009 and supervised the 11-man department for more than a decade.

“It’s time. I wore a lot of hats, but it’s just my time to go,” Gomes said. With his children off in college and his wife, Melissa, also retired, Gomes loves forward to buying a mobile home and spending time in warmer climates. “I don’t know how long it will take me to let go, but I’m working on it right now,” he said.

Detective Lt. Dennis Reimer will succeed Gomes as the supervisor of the police department’s detective division.

 

Three new officers join Plymouth Police Department

PLYMOUTH – Local police have three new officers and several more are on the way.

Thomas Petitti Jr., William Leonard and Robert Randall Jr. graduated Friday from the Randolph Police Academy. They spent their first day on the job Monday and will hit the streets with training officers soon.

Ten more recruits are scheduled to join the department after completing the Plymouth Police Academy at the end of August. Four more recruits will start attending the Cape Cod Police Academy next week.

Together the 17 new officers will bring the department to approximately 125 officers. The department is approved to carry 128 officers – 104 patrolmen and 24 supervisors. In addition to Chief Michael Botieri, the department has two captains, seven lieutenants and 14 sergeants.

Botieri said the department is still looking for at least three more officers to join the force to make up for recent retirements.

Hundreds ride in memory of fallen Plymouth police officer Gregg Maloney

PLYMOUTH – Hundreds of motorcycle and classic car enthusiasts rallied in North Plymouth in memory of a a fallen officer who loved to ride.

The sixth annual Gregg’s ride honored Plymouth Police officer Gregg Maloney, a veteran of the department’s motorcycle squad who died while on patrol in April 2014.

Some 445 motorcycles and 35 classic cars participated in this year’s ride, which began and ended at Cordage Commerce Center.

Motorcyclists rode through West Plymouth and Myles Standish State Forest before returning to North Plymouth through Manomet and the downtown waterfront. The classic cars rallied through Duxbury and Kingston.

The ride raised money for charity in honor of Maloney, a 43-year-old husband and father of two who served 17 years on the police force.

This year’s ride included a tribute to the Marine who died in a motorcycle crash just two days earlier in New Hampshire.

 

Helicopter called in to help youth trapped on dock in Plymouth pond

PLYMOUTH — Five juveniles were rescued from Bloody Pond in Plymouth Wednesday night at 9:30 p.m. after a dock floated across the pond in the dark.

The juveniles had started jumping onto the floating dock which caused it to drift further into the river. None of the juveniles knew how to swim.

Plymouth police and Plymouth Fire-Rescue were assisted by the Mass. State Police Air Wing, including Troopers Gregg Spooner, Kevin Kaupp and Andrew Hamilton, to locate the juveniles. A police helicopter crew kept a spotlight on the juveniles until a rescue boat arrived.

Mass. State Police released the video of the rescue, and it is available to watch on Youtube.

 

Plymouth man recognized for helping police apprehend fleeing suspect

PLYMOUTH – Police have recognized a local resident for helping officers apprehend the subject of a police pursuit in May.

Jamie Costa was honored with a plaque Tuesday at police headquarters for his help in corralling the assault suspect on South Street on May 22.

Police said Costa and his wife were headed to the waterfront to celebrate their wedding anniversary that Wednesday night when they saw the man crash his car and flee on foot. Police said the man had assaulted a woman at Saver’s and fled in a vehicle with his girlfriend and two infants.

Police spotted the vehicle on Pleasant Street and were in pursuit when the car crashed near the playground on South Street.

Police said Costa got out of his car and subdued the fleeing man after it became apparent that he would otherwise get away. The man was subsequently arrested for 13 offenses, including a warrant and multiple felonies.

Chief Michael Botieri, Capt. Kevin Manuel and Lt. Jason Higgins presented Costa with the plaque recognizing his assistance Tuesday.

“We like to recognize citizens who step up,” Botieri said.” He didn’t have to do that. It wasn’t his job or responsibility. He made that decision and we appreciate it.”

 

Scam spoofs Plymouth veterans

PLYMOUTH – Someone is scamming residents and businesses in the name of local veterans.

Director of Veterans Services Roxanne Whitbeck said a local business was nearly taken for $500 Wednesday by a scammer who claimed to be soliciting money for veterans through her office. Whitbeck said the scammer is able to spoof her office’s  telephone number so it appears that calls asking for donations are legitimate.

Victims of the scam are asked to leave checks taped to their door.

Whitbeck learned about the business that nearly got scammed accidentally Wednesday, when the owner called to say he’d forgotten to tape his $500 check to his door.

Police reported a similar incident a week ago, when a local woman called Town Hall to make sure the call she received was legitimate. She was about to make a $100 donation.

Whitbeck said her department is not soliciting donations and she warned residents and businesses not to be fooled.

 

Plymouth police investigate death of neglected dog

PLYMOUTH – Police are investigating the death of a dog that was found in a bag in West Plymouth Monday.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a resident found the small white dog in an insulated shopping bag in woods off Pinehurst Drive late Monday morning. Manuel said the dog had matted fur and showed signs of years of neglect.

Anyone with information about the dog is asked to call police at 508-830-4218.

 

Plymouth Community Policing Day

PLYMOUTH – Local police put their resources on display last weekend at the department’s annual Community Policing Day at Plymouth Public Library.

Saturday’s event in the library parking lot featured snacks and treats for visitors along with up-close looks at some of the department’s specialized units and equipment.

This year’s Community Policing Day included K-9 team demonstrations on the library lawn. Visitors also got to sit behind the wheel of cruisers and tour the insides of the department’s boat and armored vehicle. The department’s mounted unit was a popular attraction for young and old.

Chief Michael Botieri and his officers and staff manned the grill for lunch.

 

Plymouth teen injured in ATV crash

PLYMOUTH – A local teen was injured in an all-terrain-vehicle accident in South Plymouth Monday.

Police said the 16-year-old boy was riding in woods by the solar farm in the 1200 block of Old Sandwich Road when his vehicle rolled over. Capt. Kevin Manuel said the teen may have suffered a broken leg.

The boy was by himself when police arrived shortly after noon. He told police he was alone, but officers found evidence that other people had been riding with the boy.

Environmental Police are investigating to determine if any charges should be filed.

 

Jarheads lead procession as victim of NH motorcycle crash laid to rest

PLYMOUTH – Downtown Plymouth came to a standstill Friday morning as the town paid final respects to retired Plymouth Police Sgt. Michael Ferazzi.

Bagpipers played the Marine Corps hymn as the flag-draped casket of the Marine veteran was carried from St. Peter’s Church just before noon. Law enforcement officers from Massachusetts and New Hampshire joined with veterans from both states to help friends and family escort Ferazzi to the Massachusetts National Cemetery in Bourne for burial.

Saluting front and center were several members of the Jarheads, the New Hampshire motorcycle club that Ferazzi was riding with when he died in a crash in Randolph, New Hampshire, June 21.

Ferazzi was one of seven members of the club who were killed when a pickup truck carrying a trailer whipped into their formation on a rural highway. The club is made up of Marine veterans and their spouses.

 

South Plymouth man accused of child endangerment, drunken driving

PLYMOUTH – Police accused a South Plymouth man of child endangerment while driving under the influence of alcohol Friday.

Charles King, 49, of 264 Bourne Road, was also charged with driving under the influence of alcohol as a second offense and negligent driving.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a caller reported that King was driving erratically and almost hit another vehicle on River Run just after 5 p.m. Police found King at his home around the corner from River Run and determined he was intoxicated. Manuel said King also had two children in the vehicle with him.

 

June 2019

 

Teen hospitalized in Plymouth hit-and-run

PLYMOUTH — A teenage girl was taken to the hospital Saturday afternoon after what police say was a hit-and-run near Chestnut Street.

A 16-year-old girl from Wareham was skateboarding when she was hit, police said. She injured her hip and side and was taken to South Shore Hospital.

Police don’t know who the driver was that hit the teen, but ask anyone with information to come forward.

 

Carver man accused of running down bicyclist on Plymouth waterfront

PLYMOUTH – A Carver man is facing multiple charges after allegedly running down a bicyclist on the waterfront and then fleeing the scene.

Michael Rogers, 23, of 52 Popes Point Road, Carver, is also accused of hitting two cars before the crash that injured a 56-year-old man from Newton.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said Rogers was arguing with a passenger in his car and driving recklessly when the crash occurred shortly after 6 p.m. near 225 Water St.

The victim was riding north in a group of about 10 bicycles in the bike lane of the road when he was struck. Manuel said the Newton man was walking after the crash, but suffered hip and head injuries in the crash. He was taken to South Shore Hospital for treatment.

A police officer who had just passed the group of bicycles reported hearing an engine revving and seeing Rogers’ vehicle speeding toward him from behind. Manuel said the officer had to accelerate to avoid being hit from behind.

The officer was unaware of the crash until he stopped Rogers and noticed the commotion in the street behind them.

Rogers was charged with negligent driving, leaving the scene of personal injury and three counts of leaving the scene of property damage.

 

Retired Plymouth police sergeant dies in NH motorcycle crash

PLYMOUTH – Local police and veterans are mourning the loss of a brother.

Retired Plymouth Police Sergeant Michael FerazziRetired Plymouth Police Sgt. Mike Ferazzi was among the seven bikers who died Friday in a motorcycle crash in Randolph, New Hampshire.

A Plymouth native, Ferazzi served in the Marine Corps before he joined the local police force. He was riding with a group of fellow Marines, the JarHeads Motorcycle Club, when he died Friday night.

Ferazzi Joined the Plymouth Police Department in 1985. He retired as a sergeant in 2014 and later moved to Contoocook, New Hampshire. He was most recently working as a sheriff’s deputy for the Merrimack County Sheriff’s Department.

Police Chief Michael Botieri, who went through the police academy with Ferazzi, said Ferazzi was working as a court officer in New Hampshire.

“Mike was a great guy, great to work with and really well respected,” Botieri said. “It’s a tragedy. He will be missed.”

Plymouth Veterans Agent Roxanne Whitbeck got to know Ferazzi through his military service and became good friends with him at American Legion Post 40 in West Plymouth. Both served on the post’s color guard.

Whitbeck said Ferazzi love riding his motorcycle and was looking forward to becoming a grandfather for the second time.

“It’s a very, very sad day for Plymouth and the Plymouth American Legion,” Whitbeck said. “He was a friend and a fellow vet that I was able to help, and I was honored to serve in the color guard with him.”

Local police helped State Police and members of the Merrimack County Sheriff’s Department escort his body to Plymouth Sunday. Local police plan to conduct a departmental walk through at the funeral home in North Plymouth before Thursday afternoon’s calling hours.

A funeral Mass will be held for Ferazzi at 10:30 a.m., Friday, at St. Peter’s Church. He will be buried in the Massachusetts National Cemetery in Bourne. Memorial donations in his name may be made to the Plymouth Veterans Fund c/o Veterans Dept. Town Hall, Plymouth, MA 02360

 

Manomet man charged with arson after early morning fire at home

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a Manomet man with arson Monday after an early morning fire at his home on State Road.

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a Manomet man with arson Monday after an early morning fire at his home on State Road.

Edgar Newell, 48, of 977 State Road, was arrested after leading police on a lengthy pursuit that ended in his neighbor’s driveway. He was charged with arson, negligent driving, failure to stop for police and resisting arrest.

Chief Michael Botieri said a neighbor called police just after 1:30 a.m. Monday to report seeing someone leaving Newell’s burning home in a sport utility vehicle. Police encountered the vehicle en route to the home near State and Beaver Dam roads and attempted to stop it.

Botieri said Newell was the driver and he led police on a chase that went north to Exit 6 and west to Colony Place before returning to Manomet and the neighbor’s driveway.

The neighbor told police he was awaked by the sound of a fire alarm sounding in Newell’s house and saw flames coming from a side window of the house when he looked next door. Police said Newell was the only person home at the time.

Police reports in court records indicate fire investigators believe the fire started in the kitchen of the home and spread to the exterior and the second floor. Firefighters were able to extinguish the fire before it destroyed the home.

Investigators did not find any evidence of an accelerant in the home.

Newell was arraigned on the charges Monday in District Court. He pleaded innocent to the charges and was ordered held on $7,500 bail. The case was continued to July 9 for a probable cause hearing.

 

Suspect charged after two women stabbed at Plymouth apartment complex

PLYMOUTH – Two women are recovering from stab wounds after a fight over children’s toys turned violent at a local apartment complex Monday night.

PLYMOUTH – Two women are recovering from stab wounds after a fight over children’s toys turned violent at a local apartment complex Monday night.

Police said the 22- and 36-year-old women were treated for injuries at BID-Plymouth hospital after the 8:45 p.m. stabbing outside an apartment at the Algonquin Heights apartment complex.

Police arrested another resident of the apartment complex in connection with the stabbings.

Courtney Massey, 29, of 1 Algonquin Terrace, Apt. A24, was charged with two counts each of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and armed assault to murder.

Chief Michael Botieri said police recovered a kitchen knife believed to have been used in the stabbings, which stemmed from an argument about the use of a child’s slide.

One victim suffered slashing cuts. The other suffered more serious stab wounds. None of the injuries was considered life threatening.

Witnesses helped police identify Massey as the suspect. She was arrested in her apartment.

 

Blood drive pits Plymouth police and fire in friendly competition

PLYMOUTH – It’s being billed as the Battle of the Badges. The Plymouth Area Chamber of Commerce Blood Drive on Wednesday, June 26, will pit the Plymouth Fire against the Plymouth Police in a competition to see who can donate the most blood to the American Red Cross.

The two departments are going head to head in a friendly challenge to bring attention to the need to give the gift of life. Supplies are low and the demand is great, so both groups are encouraging the public to join them in donating blood.

“Plymouth Police and Plymouth Fire have agreed to help with the blood drive,” said Bob Nolet, director of Operations at the Plymouth Area Chamber of Commerce. “Police Chief Michael Botieri and Fire Chief Ed Bradley are asking everyone to show up and help out.”

Plymouth man, woman found dead of apparent drug overdoses

PLYMOUTH – Overdoses have once again taken lives in Plymouth.

Less than two weeks after drugs were blamed for the deaths of a couple in their 50s, a woman and a man in their 30s were found dead of apparent overdoses Tuesday morning.

Police Capt. Kevin Manuel said the victims are a 33-year-old local man and a 34-year-old local woman. They were found unresponsive by a friend at 9:41 a.m. in the woman’s apartment.

Manuel said the friend was performing CPR when officers arrived. Attempts to revive the man and woman were not successful.

Manuel said police attributed the deaths to overdoses because of powdered drugs and unprescribed medications found in the apartment. The deaths are the 11th and 12th attributed to drug overdoses in Plymouth in 2019.

Another couple – a 57-year-old man and a 58-year-old woman – died after being found unresponsive in their home in another apartment complex in town May 31.

 

Joyce was arraigned at Plymouth District Court Monday morning.

PLYMOUTH – Police say Precinct 15 Rep. Keven Joyce stole $27,920 from the town through his collection of Little Red School House user fees while working as a volunteer managing the property.

Joyce was arraigned at Plymouth District Court Monday morning on charges of embezzlement, larceny of more than $1,200 by single scheme, and withholding evidence from an official proceeding.

According to police reports, Joyce told police he took $50 every two weeks from the user fees and used some of the money on supplies and cleaning the building while creating a larger “nest egg” with the remaining money to repair the building. According to police, Joyce acknowledged that the town knew nothing about this money, or that he was taking some of it for his own use.

A probable cause hearing has been set for July 24 at Plymouth District Court.

The arraignment for Precinct 15 Rep. Keven Joyce on charges of embezzlement, larceny of more than $1,200 by single scheme and withholding evidence from an official proceeding, has been delayed until Monday, June 10 at Plymouth District Court.

PLYMOUTH – The arraignment for Precinct 15 Rep. Keven Joyce on charges of embezzlement, larceny of more than $1,200 by single scheme and withholding evidence from an official proceeding, has been delayed until Monday, June 10 at Plymouth District Court.

Joyce’s attorney, Jack Atwood, requested more time to familiarize himself with the case prior to the arraignment.

Police Chief Michael Botieri has said the charges stem from an investigation of fees paid for use of the Little Red School House in Cedarville, where Joyce served as volunteer caretaker.

Police say Joyce embezzled fees collected from various groups that rented the building.

Overdose claims a second victim in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A second person has died after an apparent drug overdose at a local apartment complex.

Police said the 57-year-old local man died Sunday at BID-Plymouth hospital, two days after he and a 58-year-old woman were found unresponsive in their apartment by a neighbor.

Police and paramedics were able to restore the man’s breathing after the couple was discovered Friday evening, but he never regained consciousness. Attempts to revive the woman were unsuccessful.

Police said narcotics were found in the apartment. The deaths are the ninth and 10th attributed to a drug overdose in Plymouth in 2019.

 

The Plymouth Police Department is nearing accreditation.

PLYMOUTH – The Plymouth Police Department is nearing accreditation.

Assessors from the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission completed a review of the local department’s policies and procedures Thursday and indicated they will recommend the department for its gold standard of policy review.

The full commission will vote on the recommendation next month. Full accreditation would come in September.

The work marks a years-long project that has seen the department evaluate and update virtually every aspect of its policies and procedures.

The department earned MPAC certification last year after assessors determined the force met requirements for 159 mandatory standards. The department has since met another 180 standards – 98 more mandatory requirements and 82 optional standards – for a comprehensive 21st century police department.

As of March, 84 of the state’s 351 police departments were accredited by the MPAC. Plymouth was one of 18 departments that had received certification. There were 111 departments in the beginning, self-assessment phase of the accreditation process.

Police Chief Michael Botieri said the recommendation for accreditation reflects a lot of hard work and team work.

Botieri said virtually every officer in the department contributed to making the process a success. It involved exhaustive internal examination of policies, procedures, facilities and equipment.

The department started working toward accreditation more than a decade ago, but the effort lost momentum with the retirement of key personnel. Botieri said the department started focusing on accreditation again a few years ago when the town created the position of an operations lieutenant.

Botieri said the accreditation should mean reduced insurance costs for the town and will give residents and town officials alike the assurance that local police are performing their duties to the highest standards.

The accreditation will be for three years and will require the department to maintain all 339 of the standards over that same time span.

“Basically it’s best practices. Our policies are something we’re really proud of. We’ve worked hard together on them, and the goal is to maintain that moving forward,” Botieri said.

Botieri noted that maintaining accreditation will require continued hard work as each of the 339 standards can include dozens of subcomponents that have to be met for accreditation.

“Whether it’s internal investigations or community policing, we’re doing it the best way with the best practices compiled,” Botieri said. “And it doesn’t happen without everyone really working together toward the common goal. The collaboration and cooperation of working together as a team is the reason we’re going to succeed.”

 

May 2019

Driver disciplined after student left on school bus in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A school bus driver is facing disciplinary action after leaving a teenaged girl aboard a bus at the end of a route Thursday.

PLYMOUTH – A school bus driver has been disciplined after leaving a teenaged girl aboard a bus at the end of a route Thursday.

Police said the 16-year-old girl was locked in the bus after the substitute driver returned to Plymouth Community Intermediate School Thursday afternoon.

The girl was one of two students who had been picked up at the Bristol County Agricultural High School in Deighton. Capt. Dana Flynn said the driver dropped off one student and then drove to the school and locked up the vehicle.

PCIS Principal Brian Palladino said the girl is a former student at his school. She told him she was not concerned when the driver stopped at the school while taking her home because the regular driver occasionally stops at the school as well, sometimes to change buses.

Palladino said the girl was not paying close attention to the driver as a result, until she looked up and saw the driver get in his truck and drive away.

The girl texted her parents, saying she was trapped on the bus. She also started banging on the bus windows. Palladino said teachers heard the banging and helped the girl out the emergency exit.

Palladino said he brought the girl to his office to make sure she was okay and notified district officials about the incident. “She seemed to be in good spirits when she realized it was an accident,” Palladino said.

Superintendent of Schools Gary Maestas said the vehicle is a smaller bus that the district owns and operates as an activities bus for students throughout the district. The bus is based out of the intermediate school, but does not transport students to and from school.

Maestas said there is no excuse for ever leaving a student on a bus and the driver was already been disciplined. “It is inexcusable and cannot happen,” Maestas said. “There has already been action taken to resolve this issue with the driver.”

 

Keven Joyce accused of embezzling town funds

PLYMOUTH – Police have accused a local Town Meeting representative of embezzling town funds.

Keven Joyce will be summoned to appear in District Court next month on charges of embezzlement, larceny of more than $1,200 by single scheme and withholding evidence from an official proceeding.

Joyce, a 70-year-old Town Meeting representative from Precinct 15, is scheduled to be arraigned on the charges in District Court June 6.

Court officials would not release details of the case until the arraignment, but Police Chief Michael Botieri said the charges stem from an investigation of fees paid for use of the Little Red School House in Cedarville, where Joyce served as volunteer caretaker.

Police started investigating after questions about the usage fees were raised during recent meetings about the future the building.

The building is used by groups like Alcoholics Anonymous. Members typically deposit $10 in cash into a locked box in the wall of the building for each meeting. There are at least eight such meetings a week. A local veterinarian uses the building as well.

Botieri said the allegations in the criminal complaint cover several years of fee payments.

Town officials have said Joyce acknowledged collecting the fees, but there is no record of the money ever being deposited with the town. Joyce has said the money is accounted for, but would not elaborate. He did not return calls for comment Friday.

Botieri said it appears nobody else will be charged in connection with the investigation.

 

Plymouth PD receives Click It or Ticket program grant

PLYMOUTH — The Plymouth Police Department received grant funding from the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security to increase seat belt enforcement patrols a part of the national Click It or Ticket campaign taking place May 13-June 2.

The Plymouth police will be joined by the Massachusetts State Police and up to 140 other local departments in this high-visibility enforcement effort designed to reduce motor vehicle deaths and injuries.

“Reducing the number of people who are needlessly injured or killed in our community is our priority,” said Chief Michael Botieri. “These funds allow us to put more patrols in high crash locations and stress the importance of buckling up to motorists who are unbuckled.”

The current Massachusetts Seat Belt Law requires all motor vehicle occupants to be properly restrained by seat belts when riding in private or commercial vehicles, including vans and trucks. Fines begin at $25 per violation. The Massachusetts Enhanced Child Passenger Safety Law requires children riding as passengers in motor vehicles to be in a federally-approved child passenger restraint that is properly fastened and secured until they are 8 years old or over 57 inches tall. Children older than 8 or taller than 57 inches must wear seat belts.

Massachusetts has more than 230 inspection sites where parents and caregivers can have their child’s car seat checked for free to ensure it is properly installed. Visit http://mass.gov/carseats for a map and listing of all inspection sites.

 

Recovery coach training in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Plymouth County Outreach will host a training program for recovery coaches, Recovery Coach Academy Part II, at the Plymouth police headquarters in June.

The four-day intensive training, scheduled for June 10-13, will provide 30 hours of required training toward the Addiction Recovery Coach Certification (CARC), which is offered by the Massachusetts Board of Substance Abuse Counselor Certification, in conjunction with the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services.

Presentation will include 14 hours of required training on Addiction 101, mental health, motivation interviewing and cultural competency, and 16 hours of training on ethical responsibility. Attendees will receive a certificate for each individual segment they attend.

Trainer Steven Chisholm is a recovery advocate with more than 25 years of experience working in the recovery community, treatment programs and education. He holds a master’s degree in counseling psychology from Lesley University and enjoys a reputation as a knowledgeable and passionate facilitator, who combines his professional and lived experience with a sense of authenticity, warmth, and humor during his highly interactive trainings.

Classes will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Thursday, June 10 to13, at the Plymouth Police Department, 20 Long Pond Road, Plymouth. Lunch will be provided. Registration is $200.

For questions, contact Vicky Butler, PCO operations supervisor, at vbutler@plymouthcountyoutreach.org.

 

UPDATE: Plymouth Police investigating Little Red School House fees

PLYMOUTH – Police are now investigating concerns about user fees at the Little Red School House.

Chief Michael Botieri said Wednesday that he was asked by Town Hall to look into concerns that fees paid for use of the building in Cedarville never made their way to town coffers.

Botieri said the request was made Tuesday and detectives have already begun talking to people who paid fees to use the town-owned school house.

Botieri said he does not think the investigation will take long and he expects to know more by the end of the week.

 

Plymouth looking into fees paid for using Little Red School House

PLYMOUTH – A new policy is in place for using the Little Red School House amid an internal town investigation about user fees.

Town Manager Melissa Arrighi said she ordered the notice be posted after learning that the town has no record of receiving any of the money that groups pay to use the town-owned building in Cedarville.

The information came out of a meeting last Tuesday of a working group headed by Director of Community Resources Barry DeBlasio looking at the future of the building, which the town is thinking about selling.

Minutes from the meeting state that volunteer caretaker Keven Joyce said he has been collecting the user fees and turns them over to the Finance Department at Town Hall. The same minutes state that DeBlasio stated that he could not find any record of these payments to the town.

Joyce would not comment Monday on any payments to the town but said that “all the money has been allocated and accounted for.”

“This is something between the town manager and myself. I was the person that took care of that place the last few years and took care of all the necessary needs and cleaned the bathrooms and provided paper goods, including $10,000 worth of new windows on a grant I wrote for the place,” Joyce said. “I have nothing to hide.”

Arrighi said she became aware of the issue only last week after a meeting held by the group that is considering whether to sell or retain the building. She said the town has a standing policy of not collecting cash as payment for services except for payments at Town Hall that come with receipts. “It can lead to too many problems,” she said.

The notice that was posted last Wednesday states that no fee can be charged for use of the building unless those fees have been approved by the Select Board. It asks users not to leave any payments in the drop box and notes the town will update users once a fee schedule has been established.

Meanwhile, all meeting groups should continue with normal schedules, but must pick up after each meeting. No new groups will be accepted until further notice.

 

April 2019

Pickup truck nearly drives off Manomet Point

PLYMOUTH – A Weymouth man narrowly avoided driving his pickup truck off Manomet Point Wednesday afternoon.

Police said the 43-year-old man drove his blue Chevrolet Silverado through a retaining wall at a home at 224 Manomet Road at 1:50 p.m. The truck went down a 10-foot embankment and came to a stop on a small lawn, just a few feet from the cliff leading to the ocean.

The oceanfront residence is located just a few houses from the tip of Manomet Point.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said police believe the driver suffered some type of medical issues before the crash. He was found slumped over the steering wheel of the truck. He was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment.

 

Police looking for pickup truck driver who approached two girls in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police are looking for the driver of an older red pickup truck who approached two young girl on a quiet local street Wednesday.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a regional alert has been issued for the older model red pickup, probably a Chevrolet, with a loud muffler and ladder rack.

Manuel said the driver, a man in his 50s, pulled up near the 7- and 8-year-old girls as they played outside a house on College Pond Road shortly after 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. When the girls ignored the man, he got out of his truck and approached them, prompting them to run home.

Manuel said the mother of one of the girls went outside and found the truck parked off the side of the road down the street. When she approached the truck to talk to the driver, he drove off.

Manuel said police want to speak with the driver. Anyone with information is asked to call Plymouth police at 508-830-4218.

 

Accreditation review underway at Plymouth Police Department

PLYMOUTH – A team of assessors from the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Commission is visiting town this week to begin examining various aspects of the Plymouth Police Department’s policies and procedures, operations and facilities.

Verification by the assessment team that the department is meeting the commission’s standards is part of a voluntary process to gain accreditation – a self-initiated evaluation process by which police departments strive to meet and maintain standards established for the profession, by the profession.

The Massachusetts Police Accreditation Program consists of 257 mandatory standards as well as 125 optional standards. To achieve accreditation status, departments must meet all mandatory standards as well as 65 percent of optional standards.

Chief Michel Botieri said achieving accreditation is a highly prized recognition of law enforcement professional excellence.

“I am very proud of the men and women of the Plymouth Police Department who have worked together over the past few years to reach this milestone,” Botieri said in a statement. “Capt. Dana Flynn has done an incredible job coordinating these efforts, as the department’s accreditation manager.”

 

Police investigating armed robbery in North Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A 20-year-old local man reported being robbed at gunpoint in North Plymouth early Wednesday morning.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the man told officers he and a friend were parked on the side of Hedge Road when a man wearing a ski mask knocked on the window of his vehicle at 2:47 a.m. The victim, a Pinehills resident, said the masked man intimated that he had a gun and stole medical equipment, a pair of sneakers and a cellphone.

 

Passenger injured after falling out of car in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – A Brockton man was treated for minor injuries after falling out of a car on a downtown street over the weekend.

Capt. Dana Flynn said the 26-year-old man was returning to a local hotel from a wedding and fell out of the back seat of a car near 164 Sandwich St. just before 11 p.m. Saturday.

Police found the man in the middle of the road and the vehicle stopped on the side of the road just up the street. The man was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment. The injuries were not considered serious

 

Plymouth man charged with fifth drunken driving offense

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a local man with his fifth drunken driving offense early Wednesday after spotting him driving slowly down the highway.

Ronald Smith, 60, of 73 Priscilla Beach Road, was arrested after the 12:26 a.m. stop on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol as a fifth offense, negligent driving, driving after license revocation for being a habitual traffic offender and driving an unregistered vehicle.

Capt. Dana Flynn said Smith was driving at 25 mph when officers stopped him on Route 3. Flynn said Smith was driving an unregistered vehicle that belonged to a relative and exhibited classic signs of intoxication.

 

Overdose victim accused of breaking into car at Plymouth hospital

PLYMOUTH – A drug overdose victim became a burglary suspect after a trip to the hospital early Wednesday.

Police revived the 42-year-old man with Narcan after his mother found him unresponsive at their downtown home at 3:18 a.m. The man admitted to using fentanyl before he was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment.

Just before 5 a.m., police returned to the hospital after the same man was found rummaging through a vehicle in the parking lot. Nothing was reported stolen. The man will be charged with breaking and entering a motor vehicle.

 

Plymouth woman loses hundreds of thousands in online scam

PLYMOUTH – An offshore, online scam has cost a local woman hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The 63-year-old Pinehills resident told police Friday that she had been taken for $235,000 by someone she befriended on the Internet. Capt. Kevin Manuel said it was unclear if the woman was investing with the friend or simply offering financial help, but she had been sending money to a person she thought ran a business in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Manuel said the friend would request money to help with the business, including a recent payment for legal fees to get merchandise cleared at a port of entry. The local woman became suspicious after noticing that computers supposedly intended for the company’s internet security were being sent to Nigeria.

She contacted local police Friday morning after learning from authorities in Pittsburgh that her “friend’s” business did not exist.

 

 

March 2019

 

Armed robbery in North Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police are investigating an armed robbery at the 7-Eleven convenience store in North Plymouth.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a man wearing a black bandana over his face entered the store just after midnight Thursday, showed a knife to the clerk and demanded money from the register.

The man fled with an unspecified amount of cash in a dark sport utility vehicle. No injuries were reported.

Manuel said the robber was a dark-skinned black man who was about 5 feet 10 inches tall and wearing a white American Eagle hooded sweatshirt.

 

K-9 Felix retiring from Plymouth police before his time

K9 Felix EOW 3-22-2019

PLYMOUTH – With heavy heart and deep regret, local police announced the sudden retirement of K-9 Felix from the department Thursday.

The 4-year-old black German shepherd recently fell severely ill and was diagnosed with an aggressive, untreatable and terminal form of cancer.

“K-9 Felix has served the town of Plymouth with honor and courage in the apprehension of numerous violent criminals as well as locating missing children and evidence,” the department said in a statement.

K-9 Felix joined the department in 2017 and was assigned to Officer Keith Larson in the patrol division. His last tour of duty will be Friday, when he will be laid to rest at 2:30 p.m. at the Court Street Animal Hospital at 136 Court St. Local police will honor Felix’ service with an honor guard as Larson escorts him to the animal hospital.

Immediately following, K-9 Felix will be taken to Angel View Crematory and Cemetery in Middleborough by police procession. The public is invited to attend.

Larson started training with Felix two years ago. They hit the streets as a team in July 2017.

“He was a great partner, a great motivated working police dog. We’re going to miss him dearly,” Larson said.

 

Suspect sought in Plymouth gas station robbery

PLYMOUTH – Surveillance footage helped police identify a man who robbed a local gas station Tuesday.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the robber grabbed money from the cash register of the Citgo station on Samoset Street while the clerk was helping another customer. Manuel said the robber shoved the clerk when the clerk tried to stop him from fleeing.

The robbery occurred just after 8 a.m. No weapons were shown. Manuel said the robber was captured on camera. Police have secured warrants charging him with robbery.

 

Social media posts spark false rumors of threat at Plymouth North

PLYMOUTH – Police investigated, but found no cause for concern after rumors of a threat at Plymouth North High School surfaced Monday morning.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the incident involved a posting on social media about the definition of the word “revenge” that originated with someone with no connection to the school. Rumors spread after a student shared the posting.

Manuel said the posting did not reference weapons and the student has no access to weapons. “It’s been vetted and there’s no credible threat,” Manuel said.

School officials tweeted to Plymouth North families Monday morning that the school had received reports of concerns about a student. The tweet stated that the school and police made contact and were looking into the situation. “We are looking forward to classes as usual today and will follow up with details as necessary,” the tweet concluded.

Principal Pete Parcellin said the posting occurred overnight and school officials and police were looking into the matter before school started Monday.

Parcellin said he made an announcement at the start of classes because he knew students were talking and made the Twitter announcement to let parents know that things were fine. Parcellin said the school followed up with calls and emails to parents as well.

 

Trash cans torched, cottage burned in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police and fire officials are looking for an arsonist who is targeting trash barrels in suburban neighborhoods near the geographic center of town.

Investigators are also trying to determine if the fires are connected to an overnight fire that destroyed a cottage in Myles Standish State Forest.

Fire Chief Ed Bradley said someone ignited trash cans outside four residences at the end of driveways on Oar and Line Road early Wednesday. Trash cans were also found burning on nearby Morgan and Clark roads and a portable toilet was torched at a construction site on Clark Road.

The fires were discovered shortly after 2 a.m. and involved trash cans that had been left out overnight for pickup Wednesday. Police later found a trash can smoldering at the bottom of a driveway on Clifford Road as well.

Bradley said firefighters found the charred remains of a cottage on College Pond just before 6 a.m. after the State Police air wing reported a fire in the forest. By the time firefighters arrived, there was nothing left of the vacation home at 36 West Cranford Road but rubble.

Bradley said investigators are trying to track down surveillance footage from the neighborhoods. Residents on garbage routes are asked to be watchful.

 

DeMacedo, Muratore support dispensing Narcan to public

PLYMOUTH – Police on the front lines of the drug epidemic are looking to use their unenviable positions to save more lives.

A recently filed bill in the state Legislature would allow law enforcement officers – in addition to medically trained personnel – to provide civilians with the overdose-reserving drug Narcan (naloxone) and train them in how to administer the drug, according to a press release on the topic.

The bill, an Act Relative to Furthering the Success of Opiate Intervention Programs, was filed in January by state Sen. Walter F. Timilty, D-Milton.

The bill was co-sponsored by state Sen. Vinny deMacedo, R-Plymouth, and state Rep. Alyson Sullivan, R-Abington. Since its filing, state Sen. Michael Brady, D-Brockton, state Sen. John Keenan, D-Quincy, and state Rep. Mathew Muratore, R-Plymouth, have also co-sponsored the bill.

The bill’s sponsors represent communities in Plymouth County. Plymouth County Outreach, a collaborative of Plymouth County police departments, also supports the bill.

If passed, the law would allow police officers to train people how to use Narcan and give civilians doses of the medication to use in the event of a person overdosing.

“Currently, only medically trained professionals, like doctors, nurses, firefighters and treatment center workers are able to provide people with Narcan and give them the training,” Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri said. “As police officers who are on the front lines dealing with the opioid crisis, we believe our officers should have the ability to further help someone before they overdose.”

East Bridgewater Police Chief Scott Allen said, “Right now, when we are at an outreach follow-up visit with our officers and recovery coaches, if an overdose survivor or their family members need Narcan, we have to refer them to a local outreach organization like BAMSI, a drop-in center or Learn to Cope. That person might not go to one of the treatment centers until later that day or the next week or at all. Maybe they change their mind. Maybe they can’t get a ride. And we have effectively closed that window of opportunity to help someone who is seeking help right then and there.”

Seeing firsthand how similar scenarios have played out during Plymouth County Outreach post-overdose outreach follow-up visits, the Police Chiefs of Plymouth County shared their concerns with Timilty, deMacedo and Sullivan late last year, and they took the initiative in filing the bill.

If passed, the change in the law would assist outreach teams, who are on the front lines across the state, and would be able to provide tools, like Narcan, to a vulnerable community at a more opportune time. Individuals who have overdosed have a high risk of suffering another overdose.

The Police Chiefs of Plymouth County offer their full support of the bill and hope to see police departments in communities throughout the state reach out to their local politicians and ask them to co-sponsor the bill and help raise awareness of this critical issue. The PCO chiefs are asking all of their state senators and state representatives to sign on and support this bill.

“I have seen firsthand the difference Plymouth County Outreach has made in my community in helping those suffering from substance use,” deMacedo said. “It is my hope that this legislation will give those on the front lines greater access to the tools they need to save lives in our communities and across the state.”

 

Karaoke To End Homelessness

PLYMOUTH – Something like this may never happen again: the chief of police, superintendent of schools and state representative all singing karaoke on the same night.

This spectacular of star-studded singers is part of the First Annual Plymouth CARE-aoke Night, from 7 to 11 p.m. Friday, March 29, at the American Legion in Plymouth. The event will raise money to support the Plymouth Taskforce to End Homelessness.

This unusual lineup of vocal talent will include the dulcet tones of Police Chief Michael Botieri, Superintendent Gary Maestas, and state Rep. Matt Muratore, R-Plymouth, as well as Cape Auto Body President Dave Gallerani and Plymouth Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Amy Naples.

These brave people will perform to the delight and derision of friends, family and fans. The First Annual Plymouth CARE-aoke Night is all for fun and to support the Task Force’s efforts to eradicate homelessness in the Plymouth area.

Tickets are $30 per individual and $350 for a table of 10. For more information, contact Julie Cloherty at 781-831-3251 or julie.cloherty@rocklandtrust.com.

The Plymouth Taskforce to End Homelessness’ goal is to find permanent housing with supportive services and provide emergency sheltering during the winter months. It works with individuals, local businesses, government agencies and community organizations to meet the needs of the homeless. 

PLYMOUTH – Police have released some details of a crash that injured a student running to his bus in the Ponds of Plymouth in South Plymouth last month.

Chief Michael Botieri said the 16-year-old boy was hit while crossing Lunn’s Way by a vehicle that failed to stop for a stop sign at Raymond Road.

Botieri said the driver, a 61-year-old resident of the Ponds of Plymouth, was charged with negligent operation after the crash. Police also requested that the Registry of Motor Vehicles suspend the man’s license because his driving represents an immediate threat to public safety.

Botieri said some drivers continue to disobey traffic signs in the development. Signs were not enforceable when the development was built years ago, but the streets and signs have since been accepted by the town and are valid.

Botieri said officers monitor streets in the development to enforce traffic safety and regularly ticket officers. The driver who hit the teen on Feb. 11 has the right to a hearing to appeal his suspension. The boy’s parents say he suffered broken bones and swelling and edema in his foot, but is recovering.

 

February 2019

Fatal overdose in Manomet

PLYMOUTH – A Manomet man has died in what police say is the fourth fatal drug overdose in town this year.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the victim is a 38-year-old man who was found dead at his home Tuesday morning. Manuel said the man was found unresponsive by his mother shortly before 10 a.m.

The man was declared dead at the scene. Manuel said police found evidence of heroin use at the scene.

The death comes amid a recent upsurge in the number of overdoses reported locally, but it is first fatal overdose in Plymouth since January.

 

Plymouth Parents of child hit by car ask for changes

PLYMOUTH – Vic and Andrea Nordberg say their 14-year-old son, Ethan, was struck by a car last week when the man driving it ran a stop sign in their development.

According to police, the teen was struck by the car at 6:59 a.m. Monday, Feb. 11 while heading to a bus stop on Lunn’s Way in the Ponds of Plymouth development. The accident is under investigation.

Meanwhile, the Nordbergs are anxious that traffic mitigation measures be implemented at the intersection of Lunn’s Way and Raymond Road, where the accident occurred.

“Our three children were walking across the street to go the bus stop when someone intentionally ran a stop sign,” Vic Nordberg told the Select Board Wednesday night.

Ethan has broken bones and swelling and edema in his foot, Nordberg added, but he will be OK.

“We have some proposed Raymond Road and Lunn’s Way improvements, like painting stop bars at the stop sign where cars are expected to stop. It’s not too much to ask for,” Nordberg said.

Nordberg also requested that the signage and speed limit in the area be reviewed.

“The response I’ve gotten already from the Select Board has been outstanding,” he added. “I would ask that you would consider striping Lunn’s way for median and side lines. And I know you’re going to say we’re not required to stripe minor collector roads. But Lunn’s Way is one of the busiest roadways in South Plymouth and one of the longest. It didn’t used to be that way but it is now.”

Ethan is recovering from his injuries; Nordberg said he and his wife are anxious that this does not happen to another child in this development, which is teaming with kids.

Select Board member Betty Cavacco said she believes the board should expedite the process to ensure that kids in the area are safe.

Select Board Chairman Ken Tavares said the board needs to consult with the Police Department and the town’s Traffic Committee to ensure that whatever is done is done correctly. Select Board member Shelagh Joyce, who serves on the Roads Advisory Committee, said the group’s next meeting is Feb. 28 at the Cedarville Fire Station on State Road.

The board voted unanimously to expedite the process of having improvements made to this intersection.

Nordberg said the Police Department and Select Board and neighbor Rep. Mathew Muratore, R-Plymouth, have all been exemplary in their responses to his concerns. He said striping Lunn’s Way and potentially Raymond Road would help the situation.

“I would like to thank God our son Ethan will eventually recover,” Nordberg said. “We pray he is the last one who gets hit by a car in the Ponds of Plymouth. Next time another child may not be so lucky.”

 

Pinehills resident reports burglary from Florida after watching break-in via security system

PLYMOUTH – A Pinehills woman called police from Florida early Monday after seeing two people enter her local home on a security camera.

Officer responded to the home on Champlain Circle at 3:40 a.m. and found the front door forced open. Porcelain statues were reported missing. Police are reviewing surveillance footage from the security system in an effort to identify the burglars.

 

Armed robbery at Plymouth gas station

Police are investigating an armed robbery at a gas station on Samoset Street.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a man in his late 20s robbed the attendant of the Citgo Station at knifepoint just before 8 p.m. Sunday. The robber fled with an undisclosed amount of cash.

The robber is described as a white man of medium build. He had facial hair and was wearing a light colored baseball hat and a black jacket and jeans. No injuries were reported. The robber fled north across Samoset Street.

 

Man found dead on downtown Plymouth sidewalk

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found unresponsive outside a downtown business early Tuesday.

The 49-year-old man was found on a sidewalk near 15 Main Street Ext. shortly after 6 a.m.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the man has lived in Boston and had family connections to Wareham. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Police found no evidence of drugs and no signs of trauma connected to the man’s death.

 

Carver man charged after aggravated assault in Plymouth

Police arrested a Carver man after an assault outside a downtown bar that sent a local man to the hospital.

James Foster, 32, of 6 Pine City Road, Carver, was arrested while driving home and charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon causing serious bodily injury.

Foster is accused of hitting the 28-year-old local man in the back of the head with a blunt object in a Middle Street parking lot after the two argued in Main Street Sports Bar and Grill. The victim was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment of a deep gash to the back of his head.

Foster was identified by friends of the victim at the scene. He was stopped and arrested while driving home to Carver. Capt. Kevin Manuel said a broken cell phone found in the vehicle may have been used in the assault.

 

Plymouth man accused of importing drugs from Colombia via dark web

Police have accused a West Plymouth man of importing drugs from Colombia via the dark web.

Andrew King, 29, was arrested at a home at 133 Bettencourt Road Thursday afternoon after taking possession of a package containing 100 40 mg Oxycodone pills. The pills had been delivered from the area of Medellin, Colombia, via DHL and weighed 22.2 grams.

King was charged with one count each of trafficking Class A, Oxycodone, possession of a Class A controlled substance, subsequent offense, heroin, and possession of a Class B controlled substance, subsequent offense, Suboxone and Subutex.

King was arrested late Thursday following an investigation that began in February by Massachusetts State Troopers assigned to the Commonwealth Interstate Narcotics Reduction Enforcement Team-South (CINRET). CINRET detectives were contacted by special agents assigned to Homeland Security Investigations regarding a series of packages being ordered and sent to a residential address in Plymouth.

District Attorney Timothy Cruz announced the arrest Friday, saying Customs and Border Protection officers had intercepted a package containing the Oxycodone pills sent from the area of Medellin, Colombia, to 133 Bettencourt Road. Further investigation identified a series of suspicious packages had been sent to that same Plymouth address since last August.

As a result, State Police sought and obtained a search warrant for the home. Thursday, troopers assigned to CINRET-South worked with detectives assigned to the Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office, Plymouth Police Department, special agents assigned to Homeland Security Investigations and Customs and Border Protection Officers to arrange a delivery of the package.

At approximately 3:40 pm, an undercover State Police trooper made delivery of the DHL package to 133 Bettencourt Road. The package was accepted by King, who carried the package into his residence before officers executed their search warrant, Cruz said in a statement.

A search of the residence yielded the DHL package containing 100 Oxycodone pills. State Police additionally seized quantities of heroin, Suboxone and Subutex, a digital scale, a laptop computer and cell phones. King was to be arraigned on the charges in Plymouth District Court Friday.

 

Plymouth Police Lt. Dana Flynn earns promotion

The new captain in the Police Department is a credit to the force.

Dana Flynn, the department’s first operations lieutenant and first accreditation manager, was promoted this week to administrative captain. As captain, Flynn will continue his work on earning accreditation for the department.

Flynn joined the department as a patrolman in 1997. He was promoted to sergeant 2001 and worked as a patrol supervisor for four years. He was promoted to lieutenant on New Year’s Day in 2005 and serviced as shift commander until 2015, when he was appointed operations lieutenant and accreditation manager. Through his work, the department has earned certification and expects to secure accreditation in June.

A lifelong Plymouth resident, Flynn is a married father of three. He graduated from Plymouth-Carver High School in 1982 and earned a bachelor’s degree in marine engineering from Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

He has since earned a master’s degree in criminal justice administration from Western New England College and a master’s degree in emergency management from Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

Flynn fills a vacancy created by the retirement in December of Capt. John Rogers. Capt. Kevin Manuel serves as operations captain for the department.

In announcing the promotion Thursday, Chief Michael Botieri said Flynn will continue his work on getting the department accredited.

“Dana has done an excellent job for the department and the town,” Botieri said. “He’s been a lieutenant for over a dozen years. He headed up our accreditation program and he’s done a phenomenal job with that. He’s gotten the department to certification and we anticipate accreditation later this year, which is a great milestone for this town.”

“So we’re happy to announce he’s been promoted to the position of captain. At this point, he’ll be assigned the administrative captain and continue his duties as accreditation manager as well.”

January 2019

Fatal overdose in Plymouth

A 23–year-old local woman has died in what police say was the town’s second fatal drug overdose of the new year.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said a roommate found the woman dead in her bedroom of their Manomet home Monday morning. Manuel said the woman had been dead for some time. Police found heroin and drug paraphernalia in the room.

Earlier this month, a 27-year-old local man died of an apparent overdose after he was found unresponsive in the bathroom of a local restaurant. He was taken to the hospital, but efforts to revive him were not successful.

The man’s Jan. 9 death marked the town’s first fatal overdose of the year. Police reported 12 fatal overdoses in Plymouth in 2018.

 

Plymouth man accused of taking photos in Walmart restroom

Police have accused a local man of taking photographs of a person using a bathroom at Walmart.

Nicolas Taylor, 30, of 18 Montgomery Drive, was arrested Saturday afternoon on a charge of photographing sexual or intimate parts without consent.

Lt. Dana Flynn said Taylor is accused of taking pictures of a 19-year-old man who was using a bathroom at the store on Colony Place. The victim, a Walmart employee, told police Taylor was crawling on his hands and knees in a bathroom stall and used his cellphone to take pictures of him from beneath a divider between the stalls.

Flynn said police seized Taylor’s cellphone and have sent it to detectives for analysis. Taylor was also arrested on an outstanding warrant charging him with making annoying telephone calls.

 

Kingston man charged with manufacturing illicit drug

KINGSTON – A Kingston man allegedly manufacturing methamphetamine at his home on Ring Road was arrested Thursday, Jan. 17, along with a Bourne woman.

Kingston Police detectives, in coordination with Boston and Plymouth Police detectives and the Drug Enforcement Agency, executed a search warrant at 81 Ring Road, according to a press release from the Kingston Police.

Joseph Gardner, 35, of 81 Ring Road, and Stephanie Dubis, 41, of 9 Bayberry Road, Bourne, were arrested by Kingston detectives on charges of manufacturing a Class B substance, possession with intent to distribute a Class B substance and conspiracy to violate drug laws.

Gardner and Dubis were arraigned in Plymouth District Court Thursday afternoon and ordered held on bail, according to Detective Mike Skowyra. The search warrant was executed at 8:30 a.m. as a result of an investigation, but he could not comment on the nature of the investigation. He said some methamphetamine was recovered but could not say how much.

The search warrant was the result of a multi-agency investigation into the suspected manufacturing of methamphetamine at the residence.

“During the execution of the search warrant, multiple pieces of evidence were recovered indicating the possession, distribution and manufacture of methamphetamine. The materials used at illicit “meth labs” using a “one-pot cook method” are inherently dangerous and explosive in nature,” the press release states. “Therefore, a professionally trained clandestine lab team assigned to the DEA was utilized to execute the search warrant and render hazardous materials safe.”

The scene wasn’t cleared until around 4 p.m. due to the hazardous nature of the substance.

A Stephanie Dubis was also charged in a raid of an alleged meth lab at a home in North Plymouth in February 2017. At that time, an address for Dubis, then 39, was listed as Forest Avenue Court, Plymouth. She also faced manufacturing and conspiracy charges in that case.

Neighbor charged after car break-in at hospital in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Workers in a medical building near BID-Plymouth hospital called police after seeing a man breaking into a car in the hospital’s parking lot Wednesday. A description of the burglar led police to a suspect who lived just a few doors away.

Seth Robidoux, 27, of 293 Sandwich St., was charged after the 9 a.m. break-in with receiving stolen property worth more than $1,200 and possession of a Class A drug (heroin). Robidoux was also arrested on a default warrant on a shoplifting charge.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said Robidoux was in possession of more than $1,200 in electronics and other belongings taken from a Boston man whose wife was having a baby at the hospital. Police were able to recover most of the victim’s belongings. Robidoux was also in possession of a quantity of heroin, Manuel said.

 

PLYMOUTH – Police are investigating a break-in at the Second Church of Plymouth.

Someone forced their way into a locked office at the church on State Road in Manomet while the building was open for group activities this week. The break-in was reported Thursday. Gift cards to local supermarkets were reported stolen.

 

Driver charged as repeat OUI offender in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a Pembroke man as a repeat drunken driving offender after a traffic stop in West Plymouth Tuesday night.

Christopher Firnrohr, 51, of 25 Reservoir Road, Apt. C9, Pembroke, was charged after the 8:40 p.m. stop with negligent driving, driving under the influence of alcohol as a third offense, possession of an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle and two counts each of possession of a Class B substance and possession of a Class E substance.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said another driver alerted police that Firnrohr was driving erratically on Federal Furnace Road. Police determined Firnrohr was under the influence of alcohol after stopping him on Samoset Street.

Police found an open container of Twisted Tea in Firnrohr’s vehicle. Police also found numerous pills, including Xanax, Adderall and steroids in Firnrohr’s possession.

 

Fraud alert after three scams reported in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police warned residents to be wary of requests for money and personal information after three scams were reported this week.

On Monday, a downtown resident reported that he gave a caller personal information after being told his bills needed updating. Also on Monday, a North Plymouth resident reported losing $600 while trying to purchase a pit bull dog online.

On Tuesday, a grandfather from West Plymouth reported losing $2,000 after getting a bogus call about his grandson. The caller claimed to be the grandson’s lawyer and said he needed $2,000 in gift cards to help the grandson with a drunken driving charge.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the grandfather purchased $2,000 worth of gift cards at Walmart and gave the payment codes to the caller over the telephone before realizing he’d been scammed. Manuel warned residents not to provide callers with personal information or pay for services with gift cards.

 

Three charged with bb gun vandalism spree in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Surveillance video helped police unravel a drive-by vandalism spree in downtown Plymouth Saturday.

Lt. Dana Flynn said video from a downtown business led officers to charge three teens with shooting bbs at cars and windows from a passing vehicle.

The teens – an 18-year-old and a 19-year-old from Plymouth and a 17-year-old from Braintree – were charged with vandalizing property, discharging a bb gun or air rifle on a public way and three counts of malicious damage to a motor vehicle.

Flynn said the three teens are accused of damaging two cars on Court Street, another car on Alden Street and the picture windows of the smoke shop on Samoset Street.

Employees of the smoke shop provided the crucial link to the investigation. The workers checked the store’s surveillance cameras after they kept hearing something hit the shop’s windows Saturday afternoon. They noticed that the noise coincided with a vehicle driving by slowly with the passenger window down.

Police had already received a complaint Saturday morning from a resident in the 100 block of Court Street that two vehicles had been damaged by bb shots. Police were on their way to investigate another incident on Alden Street Saturday evening when they spotted the vehicle identified by the smoke shop employees at a residence on that street.

Officers found bb pellets and cartridges for an air gun in the vehicle. Their investigation determined that all three teens had been driving around in the vehicle earlier in the day.

Wareham man found bleeding in downtown Plymouth

 

A private property dispute is turning ugly in North Plymouth

The dispute centers on renovations underway at B & B Auto on Court Street.

Police were called to the auto shop on Thursday and Friday.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the disturbances centered on a project to renovate on the south side of the building, which had been obscured for years by Stein’s furniture store. Local builder Gus Diodato bought and demolished the store last year, exposing the auto shop’s long-hidden south side.

Manuel said police responded to a disturbance Thursday afternoon and a parking complaint Friday morning. Manuel said both incidents were deemed a civil matter and will be resolved in civil court if necessary.

Meanwhile, red, white and blue plywood panels have gone up in front of the fence surrounding the vacant site of the former furniture store. The white center panel has the words TRUMP DIODATO with dollar signs on either side painted in red. At the top of the panel is a carved sign that states WELCOME TO THE GATES OF HELL.

Workers at the site referred questions to Diodato. Workers at the auto shop referred questions to owner Kevin Connolly. Neither was available for comment Friday afternoon.

 

December  2018

Plymouth Police Capt. John Rogers to retire by end of year

The longtime voice of the Plymouth Police Department is going quietly.

Capt. John Rogers will retire next week after more than 33 years on the force. As operations captain for the department since December 2008, Rogers has been second in command and on call around the clock for emergency operations for the last 10 years. He announced his retirement plans Thursday.

Rogers will be 59 when he leaves Dec. 28. He said he wants to spend more time with his family, but is also looking at other opportunities to pursue in the law enforcement field in retirement. An instructor for the Plymouth Police Academy since 1997, he will continue his teaching duties after leaving the department. He currently serves on the Municipal Police Training Committee’s State Patrol Procedures Advisory Committee.

The retirement comes at the end of a difficult year that saw Rogers accused of assaulting a fellow officer.

He spent three months on paid leave while the case was investigated and heard in court. A magistrate and later a judge cleared Rogers of any wrongdoing, but he still faces a harassment complaint stemming from the incident. “As troubling as that was, I was always confident in the outcome because I knew I did nothing wrong,” he said.

Rogers joined the local police department in May 1985. He transferred from the Rockland police force as a seasonal intermittent officer and was assigned to patrols on the waterfront and the beach. Rogers was hired as a full-time officer that September and completed the police academy in 1986.

Rogers served nearly a decade as a patrolman and earned a commendation in 1989 for wading into the ocean off Nelson Beach to rescue a woman who drove into the water.

By the mid-1990s, Rogers was assigned to the detective bureau and was selected to work on the cold case investigation of the murder of Ruth Masters, a school teacher who was brutally killed in Myles Standish state forest in 1977.

Rogers was a senior in high school when Masters was murdered. He worked on the case with State Police investigators, and was back on the street, after a promotion to sergeant, when a grand jury finally indicted suspect Eric Anderson.

Rogers said it was especially gratifying to win a conviction against Anderson because the victim’s spouse was rumored to have committed the crime. “Justice was found for the Masters family,” he said.

Rogers won promotion to lieutenant and went on to supervise the detective division. He was promoted to captain in 2008. At the same time, then-Capt. Michael Botieri was named chief and Lt. Bruce McNamee became administrative captain.

Rogers said it was a privilege to work with Botieri and he is proud to have been a part of initiatives that created specialty units such as the department’s mounted, marine, street crimes, K-9, bicycle and motorcycle squads.

Botieri said he will miss working with Rogers, saying his retirement is a loss to the department. “They say when you’re ready to go you know it, and he’s just ready,” Botieri said. “He has a lot of institutional knowledge. He’s been working with me for 10 years. It’s a great loss.”

Botieri noted the work of Rogers and McNamee in transforming the force into a full service department over the last decade. In addition to the specialty units, the department is up to date on training and equipment, he said.

Botieri said he will begin filling positions in the new year, but it may take up to three months to backfill all the new openings once promotions start. McNamee left the department last spring to take the job of chief in Edgartown. His position was filled by Capt. Kevin Manuel.

Rogers said the new hires will face different challenges from the ones he encountered joining the department in the mid 1980s.

“Policing is a lot more difficult by the day. There are a lot of mental health issues out there and a lot more violence out there. Some people don’t trust the police, and, because of that, we have to go out and rehabilitate relationships with the public,” Rogers said. “But then there are many people who see a uniform and say thank you for your service. It’s unprecedented, but it’s become a more and more difficult job.”

Rogers noted how it used to be a rare day when an officer used resuscitation training to save a life. With the number of drug overdoses from the opioid crisis, officers now routinely bring people back from the dead.

“Despite the fact that it’s more difficult, I think it’s the most honorable job in the world, and I couldn’t see myself doing anything else,” Rogers said.

 

Tree lighting, road race traffic restrictions:  Friday night’s holiday activities

Police have announced several traffic restrictions and street closures for Friday evening’s annual Christmas tree lighting in Town Square and Winter Lights 5K Road Race through downtown.

The race starts after the tree lighting at approximately 6 p.m. Runners will step off on Court Street at South Russell Street and proceed north to Nelson Street, east to Water Street, south to Union Street, through Stephen’s Field, then return to the finish at Shirley Square via Sandwich Street, Main Street Extension and Main Street.

The following street closures will be in effect from 4 to 9 p.m. for the tree lighting and road race.

Court Street, Main Street and Main Street Extension will be closed to all traffic from Brewster to Water streets.

Market Street will be closed at Summer Street to all traffic to Town Square.

Leyden Street will be closed to westbound traffic at Water Street.

South Russell Street will be closed at Town Hall.

In addition, temporary traffic restrictions will be in place for the Winter Lights 5K Road Race.

Southbound traffic on Court Street will be diverted west on Olmstead Terrace until the last runner enters Nelson Street.

There will be no through traffic from Allerton Street at Clyfton and Vernon streets and from Water Street at Brewster and Chilton streets and no southbound traffic on Court Street from Samoset Street until the last runner passes Samoset Street.

 

November 2018

 

 

Plymouth Police moving entrance to headquarters

PLYMOUTH – How bad has traffic gotten along Long Pond Road?

Even police are rethinking how do get in and out of the office.

The Police Department is closing the main entrance to police headquarters at 20 Long Pond Road in the coming weeks and will divert all traffic to the station’s parking lot through the old entrance to the town’s transfer station out back.

Chief Michael Botieri said the move will take place in the next few weeks but has been years in the making. “It’s been dangerous for a long time,” Boteri said in announcing the move this week.

When the station opened at the Exit 5 in the mid 1990s, much of the development in the area did not exist. There was the police station and the Memorial Press Group’s old newspaper offices opposite one another at the end of Exit 5, and then the Brigantine Square shops and some other small businesses heading south to Camelot Industrial Park and Plymouth Community Intermediate School.

The county jail opened soon after police arrived and two major shopping plazas, one at Home Depot Drive, and another at Shop at 5 Way, opened in the area since then. The transfer station has closed, but plans for a mammoth housing complex are now in the works for land off Home Depot Drive.

Of more pressing concern, perhaps, is the opening of a new truck stop right next to the police station. Alltown gas and convenience is set to open at 22 Long Pond Road any day and will include fueling services for tractor trailers.
All traffic out of the truck stop onto Long Pond Road will be required to make a right turn past the entrance to the police station. “People won’t be able to see and it will be unsafe to stop and turn,” Botieri said.

Under the new traffic plan, visitors will reach the station by proceeding to the lights at Home Depot Drive and turning south toward the Plymouth County Correctional Center at 26 Long Pond Road. They will then turn left along the access road to the former transfer station and then left again into the police station from the rear. Visitors will want to make sure they don’t go too far down the old transfer station access road: The end past the police station is off limits to all but authorized personnel.

The current entrance will be closed off with barriers and the driveway eventually will be converted to a grass-lined sidewalk. The dimensions of the parking lot will not change. New blue signs have been erected to guide visitors in and out of the station.

There is no word on whether the department will have to change its address as a result or what that address might even be. While many people use the road opposite Home Depot Drive as a short cut to Shops at 5 Way, the road is simply the driveway to the sheriff’s department and the county jail.

 

Manomet man accused of neighborhood break-in

PLYMOUTH – Police accused a Manomet man of breaking into a neighbor’s home and stealing while the victims slept.

The break-in unraveled on Kathleen Drive shortly after 6 a.m. Monday, Capt. Kevin Manuel said, when the homeowners heard someone downstairs and found the man trying to steal their vehicle. After a confrontation in the driveway, the burglar ran away, but a K-9 team tracked him to a nearby home on Penny Lane, where he was living in the basement of his parents’ house.

Police found items belonging to the victims outside the suspect’s house, indicating that the man had taken things from the house and then gone back for more, all while the victims slept. The victim identified the suspect as the man he confronted in his driveway.

Police charged Michael Feinstein, 31, of 11 Penny Lane, with unarmed burglary, larceny from a building, breaking and entering a vehicle at night for a felony, possession of a Class B substance as a subsequent offense and attempted larceny of a motor vehicle. Manuel said Feinstein was in possession of buprenorphine, a generic form of suboxone, when arrested.

 

Plymouth man charged with trafficking cocaine

PLYMOUTH – A month-long investigation led to the search of a South Plymouth home and the arrest of a local man Friday on a drug trafficking charge.

Police said John Morini, 23, of 331 Long Pond Road, was arrested after the 3:26 p.m. search on charges of trafficking in cocaine, possession of a Class D substance (marijuana) and possession of a Class E substance (buspirone).

Capt. Kevin Manuel said police found a packet of cocaine with an estimated street value of $5,000, marijuana with an estimated street value of $1,000 and $15,804 in cash during the search of Morini’s home.

 

Plymouth teen nabbed stealing necklace at jewelry store

PLYMOUTH – Police didn’t have much trouble identifying a suspect in the theft of a necklace from a local jewelry store Friday.

The young man seen taking the necklace on surveillance video had earlier given the store clerk his license to apply for a credit card. The 18-year-old South Plymouth resident was later arrested on a charge of larceny of more than $1,200.

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the theft occurred at Kay Jewelers shortly before noon and the necklace belonged to a woman who took it to the jeweler to have the clasp repaired. The teen was seen taking the necklace after the woman placed it on a counter and left it unattended while shopping.

The teen was arrested several hours later at Nelson Park. Manuel said police recovered the necklace and will return it to the owner.

 

Mom accused of driving drunk with child, fleeing crash in downtown Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police said a New Bedford woman was drunk and driving with her daughter when she fled a downtown crash Monday evening.

Jacqueline Bolduc, 36, of 121 Rodney St., Apt. 2, New Bedford, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol as a second offense, negligent driving, leaving the scene of property damage, leaving the scene of personal injury, child endangerment while driving under the influence , resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.

Capt. John Rogers said Bolduc had her 8-year-old child in her van when she sideswiped another vehicle on North Park Avenue at 6:42 p.m. Rogers said Bolduc exhibited symptoms of intoxication when officers stopped her as she drove south on State Road.

Rogers said Bolduc had a prior drunken driving case in 2014. A person in the other vehicle suffered a minor injury in the crash. Bolduc was not injured. Her daughter was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for evaluation as a precaution.

 

Police seek driver after hit-and-run crashes in West Plymouth and Carver

PLYMOUTH – Police are looking for the driver involved in separate crashes Friday night in West Plymouth and Carver.

Capt. John Rogers said a vehicle registered to a Carver resident rear-ended another car at Federal Furnace and South Meadow roads at 7:31 p.m. The driver did not stop and fled toward Carver after the crash.

Police later found the vehicle crashed into a utility pole just over the town line in Carver. Again, the driver fled. Efforts to track the driver Friday night using a K-9 team were unsuccessful.

 

Woman accused of driving drunk in Plymouth with girl, 8, in car

PLYMOUTH — Bail has been set at $5,000 for a New Bedford woman who police say was driving drunk with an 8-year-old girl in the car when she was pulled over after a hit-and-run crash in Plymouth on Monday.

Jacqueline Bolduc, 36, was arraigned in Plymouth County District Court on Tuesday on charges of second-offense drunken driving, negligent driving, leaving the scene of a crash causing property damage and personal injury, endangering a child while drunken driving, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. She is due back in court Dec. 12.

Plymouth police Capt. John Rogers said the girl was in Bolduc’s van when she sideswiped another vehicle on North Park Avenue just before 7 p.m. Monday. Rogers said Bolduc was showing signs of intoxication when she was pulled over on State Road.

A person in the other vehicle suffered a minor injury in the crash. Bolduc was not injured. Her daughter was taken to Beth Israel Deaconess-Plymouth Hospital for evaluation as a precaution.

Rogers said Bolduc had a prior drunken driving case in 2014.

 

White Horse Beach Party Brings Charges

Twelve teens will face charges in connection with a party at a White Horse Beach cottage last weekend.

Police said each of the 12 will be charged with possession of alcohol by a minor. One of the teens will face additional charges of malicious destruction of property and breaking and entering.

Police found the teens in a vacant summer cottage on Avenue C after responding to a break-in complaint at 1:27 a.m. Saturday. The teens ranged in age from 17 to 19 and including males and females from Plymouth and other towns.

Police said the teens were drinking alcohol when police arrived. They did not break any windows or doors to gain entry, but one teen is accused of breaking in and breaking a television set. They will be summoned to court to face the charges.

 

Vehicle found submerged behind Town Brook dam in Plymouth removed, identified

Capt. Kevin Manuel said the car was a 1979 Pontiac Sunfire. The compact car had no plates and its vehicle identification number had rusted off. Manuel said the car was full of silt, but nothing else after it was removed from the brook this week. Police believe the vehicle may have been stolen and abandoned behind the dam.

 

Plymouth man charged with threatening animal cruelty

Police charged a Manomet man with threatening to commit animal cruelty after a disturbance between dog walkers Tuesday.

The 26-year-old man was charged with threatening animal cruelty, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and trespassing after the mid-morning disturbance on Boutemain Avenue.

A woman told police she was walking her dog when the man told her the pit bull mix that he was watching for a friend could eat her dog. The woman went home and called police, prompting officers to respond and speak with the man.

A short time later, the man allegedly went to the woman’s house and banged on her door, saying his dog was going to eat her dog. Manuel said the man created disturbance when officers returned and struggled when they arrested him.

 

October 2018

Manomet man charged with third drunken driving offense

Police arrested a Manomet man as a repeat drunken driving offender Thursday after investigating a complaint about an erratic driver on State Road.

David Wayne, 35, of 23 Colony Beach Boulevard, was arrested in his driveway after the 3:18 p.m. complaint on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol as a third offense, negligent driving and possession of an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle.

Capt. John Rogers said a caller following Wayne reported he nearly hit a guardrail and rocks as they traveled over the Pine Hills, crossed the double yellow line near the Moose Lodge and then came to a complete stop in the road near St. Bonaventure Church.

Rogers said Wayne exhibited symptoms of intoxication when officers caught up with him in his driveway. Wayne was outside of the vehicle at the time. Police found a partially full can of beer in the console of the car.

Rogers said Wayne had prior drunken driving cases in 2003 and 2007.

 

Police investigating break-ins in South Plymouth

Three burglaries were reported Friday afternoon on Bourne Road. Two of the break-ins occurred in the 500 block of the street. The other occurred in the 200 block.

A resident of the 200 block reported finding a rear window broken and the house ransacked after returning home at 3:49 p.m. Two jewelry boxes containing an assortment of jewelry, including a diamond wedding ring, were reported missing. A jar of change was also stolen.

A resident of the 500 block found the rear basement door smashed in after returning home at 6:41 p.m. Silver coins, jewelry and homegrown marijuana were reported stolen. The other burglary in the 500 block was reported at 2:31 p.m. Details of that break-in were not immediately available.

 

Manomet woman charged with third OUI after weekend crash

Susan Donovan, 58, of 20 Kathleen Drive, was arrested after the 8:10 p.m. crash on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol as a third offense and negligent driving.

Capt. John Rogers said Donovan’s Chevrolet Impala hit a Subaru Forester as she turned south from Beaver Dam Road onto State Road. Rogers said Donovan crossed the double yellow line of the road while making the turn and exhibited symptoms of intoxication while talking to police after the crash. She had prior drunken driving cases in 1990 and 2009, Rogers said.

 

Should Plymouth teachers in local schools be armed?

PLYMOUTH – Should teachers in local schools be armed?

The Plymouth School Committee doesn’t think so.

The board is normally quiet on the issue of school safety, preferring to address security issues behind closed doors. But in a meeting Monday, the Committee voted to support a non-binding resolution that would reject arming teachers.

The resolution, recommended by Supt. Gary Maestas and endorsed by local Police Chief Michael Botieri, passed unanimously, without comment or discussion.

The resolution is one of nine matters of public policy that the Massachusetts Association of School Committees will consider at its annual meeting next month. The approved resolutions will form MASC’s platform in consulting with legislators in the coming year.

As a member board, the local School Committee has a vote on each resolution. Though non-binding, the resolution offered the local board’s first opportunity to act or speak on the issue.

The resolution, proposed over the summer, was offered in response to President Donald Trump’s suggestion to arm teachers and other school staff members after mass shootings earlier this year in Florida and Texas. The MASC resolution notes the support for safe schools, but says the safest environment would be to provide additional mental health resources and violence prevention programs in schools.

 

Botieri said Tuesday that he and most police chiefs throughout the state would not recommend arming school staff.

“That would just confuse and make things more difficult for us to respond if different people were armed throughout the building. It would definitely lend toward confusion,” Botieri said. “We’ve been working toward making the response to schools much safer by following different protocols and lockdown procedures. If you added in the mix that specific teachers would be armed I think that would be a major step backward for us.”

School Committee member Kim Hunt is the board’s current delegate to MASC and was a member of the Resolutions Committee that proposed the resolution.

Hunt acknowledged that the school board generally prefers to address security issues quietly. “It’s great to inform the public, but you also don’t want to inform the bad guys,” she said.

But Hunt said the board’s silence on the resolution Monday was more a matter of consensus than concerns about discussing security in public.

“I just think it is so unnecessary. We have enough safety measures in place and we have good relations with police officers. Our police chief is against it as well, which I think says a lot,” she said, noting that police have assigned four armed police officers as school resources officers in local schools.

“I am not against guns personally and I’m not looking to take anyone’s rights away; I just don’t’ think that school is the place for it. The teachers aren’t paid enough and they’re not trained enough,” Hunt said. “I think it would make it less safe to have guns in our schools.”

As delegate to MASC, Hunt will vote for the local board in favor of the resolution against arming teachers and other school staff when the state association meets in November in Hyannis.

 

Worker Critically Injured by Electric Shock

PLYMOUTH – A construction worker from Sandwich was critically injured Wednesday while working at a home on the downtown waterfront.

Police said the 32-year-old man was working on a house at Water Street and Caswell Lane when he suffered an electrical shock at 3:44 p.m.

Capt. John Rogers said the man was working on staging when he either got too close to or came in contact with the primary power line feeding the property. Rogers said the man was critically injured and unconscious when he taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment.

The worker was later moved to another hospital, Rogers said, but his condition was not known Thursday. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is investigating.

 

Student caught selling liquid weed at Plymouth North

PLYMOUTH – Police have accused a student of selling a liquid form of marijuana at Plymouth North High School.

Capt. John Rogers said a school administrator caught the 16-year-old boy selling THC ampoules used for vaping in a second floor bathroom at the school Friday morning. A search of the student’s car revealed 12 grams of the product and a pellet gun.

Police arrested the boy on charges of possession of a pellet gun by a minor, possession of marijuana by a person younger than 21 and possession of a Class D substance with intent to distribute.

Plymouth Town Meeting approves new police officers, firefighters

PLYMOUTH – The town manager’s words were used at Town Meeting Saturday to argue against approval of increases in personnel for the Police and Fire departments. Both articles 2a1 and 2a2 passed by large margins.

Precinct 15 Town Meeting Rep. Richard Caproni began the debate saying that he regretted having to argue against increases in safety personnel.

“The first thing I want to say is that the town of Plymouth is blessed with a professional and responsive group of first responders. Thank you for your efforts,” Caproni said. “The last thing I wanted to do this morning was speak against hiring these additional officers for police and fire, but we are being asked not to approve $60,000 or $400,000, but you are being asked to approve millions and millions of dollars spent over the career span of these additional employees.”

“Do we have the money?” Caproni said. “The town manager has suggested we need to be frugal. Should we be adding this when we have serious fiscal challenges? My opinion is that Plymouth is a very safe place to live. Nine additional officers will not make us safer. The response time at the Fire Department is more than satisfactory; additional personnel are not needed.”

Other speakers used the same theme.

“We all agree we want to be safe and provide our constituents every safety available,” Town Meeting Rep. Wrestling Brewster said, echoing Caproni’s tone, adding as well that the town was looking at tough times ahead.

The town manager’s concerns, raised weeks before during a discussion of the rising costs of health care for town employees, also included her hope that her words would be used to justify cuts or excess fiscal conservatism.

On Saturday, however, Arrighi took the unusual step of speaking out during the debate to ask Town Meeting to support those articles.

Other speakers noted the pace of residential construction in town and the corresponding need for services.

The Police Department’s nine new officers, it was suggested, would have a positive effect on overtime costs. The Fire Department’s 12 new hires would come from a federal program that, in the first few years, would feature dramatic levels of reimbursement. Eventually, though, the costs will be borne entirely by the town.

It was the first test of the outlook of Town Meeting. The votes were not close.

Article 2a1, nine new officers in the Police Department, passed 96-24, an 80 percent approval rate. The approval of this article would have an impact on the fiscal year 2019 budget (which began July 1 this year) of $118,226, representing the hiring of junior officers in the last three months. In the fiscal 2020 budget salaries and benefits for these officers would total $546,274, with a onetime added cost for equipment of $76,580.

The Fire Department article, 2a2, passed by a slightly smaller margin, 92-30. Under the federal SAFER grant, 75 percent of the cost of salaries for the 12 new firefighters will be paid for by the grant in the first two years, dropping to 35 percent in year three.

Over the course of the grant the town will receive just over $2 million.

 

Manomet Man Repeat Drunken Driving Arrest

PLYMOUTH – Police arrested a Manomet man as a repeat drunken driving offender Thursday after investigating a complaint about an erratic driver on State Road.

David Wayne, 35, of 23 Colony Beach Boulevard, was arrested in his driveway after the 3:18 p.m. complaint on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol as a third offense, negligent driving and possession of an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle.

Capt. John Rogers said a caller following Wayne reported he nearly hit a guardrail and rocks as they traveled over the Pine Hills, crossed the double yellow line near the Moose Lodge and then came to a complete stop in the road near St. Bonaventure Church.

Rogers said Wayne exhibited symptoms of intoxication when officers caught up with him in his driveway. Wayne was outside of the vehicle at the time. Police found a partially full can of beer in the console of the car.

Rogers said Wayne had prior drunken driving cases in 2003 and 2007.

Kevin Manuel promoted to captain in Plymouth Police Department

Local police have tapped a veteran lieutenant to fill the role of the department’s administrative captain.

Lt. Kevin Manuel, who joined the force in 2000 as a patrolman, was promoted to captain by Chief Michael Botieri on Monday. A former shift commander for the department, Manuel succeeds former Capt. Bruce McNamee, who resigned earlier this year to take a post as police chief in Edgartown.

A Marine Corps veteran with bachelor and master’s degrees in criminal justice from Curry College, Manuel was assigned as a mountain bike officer in 2009. In 2011, he was trained and certified as a motorcycle officer and was assigned to the MetroLEC regional police force. The Metropolitan Law Enforcement Council is a consortium of several law enforcement agencies that provides specialist services to the region.

Manuel was promoted to sergeant in 2014 and assigned to the patrol division as a patrol supervisor. Manuel was promoted to lieutenant in 2016 and assigned as a shift commander, responsible for supervision of all officers assigned to the shift.

Botieri said Manuel has always been a competent and valuable member of the department and has always performed his duties in a professional manner.

Manuel’s promotion triggered two other promotions in the department, Botieri said.

Sgt. Ray Reid, records supervisor, will be promoted to lieutenant and assigned to the patrol division as a shift commander. Officer John Bonasera will be promoted to sergeant.

 

A Plymouth town employee was injured while trying to fix a downtown water main break.

Police said the 60-year-old man, an employee of the town’s water department, was hit in the head by the bucket of a backhoe while working on Main Street Extension at 7:13 p.m. The worker was knocked unconscious, but was conscious and alert when he was taken to the hospital for treatment.

Workers were trying to fix a water main break that occurred while Riley Brothers, a subcontractor for Eversource, replaced a gas main on the street, police said. The water main break cut water service to a portion of downtown for several hours. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigated.

 

Plymouth County Outreach to receive Federal Grant

PLYMOUTH — The Police Chiefs of Plymouth County announced that Plymouth County Outreach has been awarded a federal grant that will significantly improve the services provided by the group in the coming years.

PCO will receive the $496,650 grant as part of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act Program through the U.S. Department of Justice. The award is among the first major federal funding grants to go toward substance use disorder treatment and recovery legislation, with the aim of addressing the ongoing opioid epidemic.

“We are incredibly fortunate to have been selected by the DOJ for the CARA grant and these funds will hopefully go a long way toward helping our Plymouth County residents who have been impacted by the opioid crisis and their families,” East Bridgewater Police Chief Scott Allen said.

The funds, which will be dispersed over the next two years, will allow PCO to hire two full-time staff members: a project coordinator and an operations supervisor. Those positions will allow PCO to offer better resources to individuals who are in need of treatment in a more streamlined and effective fashion.

“We will be looking to hire two full-time staff members who are dedicated to working with Plymouth County residents each and every day and can represent Plymouth County Outreach in all of our communities,” Middleborough Police Chief Joseph Perkins said.

In addition, the money will allow PCO to improve their Critical Incident Management System database, which tracks the number of overdoses in the region and allows for research and detailed analysis of the data collected to be studied by PCO’s treatment and healthcare partners.

“In receiving this grant from the federal government this shows, I believe, that our program and approach is on the forefront of combining the efforts of law enforcement, healthcare providers and treatment professionals in providing care to those opioid users in our communities who are in need,” Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri said.

In addition to Plymouth County Outreach, 11 other Massachusetts programs will receive a total of $8.4 million in grant funding:

Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office awarded $541,300

  • Middlesex District Attorney’s Office awarded one grant of $360,000 and one of $500,000
  • Boston Police Department awarded $305,362
  • City of Holyoke Police Department awarded $448,025
  • Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court awarded $1.5 million
  • Advocates for Human Potential awarded $1.55 million
  • City of Worcester awarded $744,668

    Franklin County Sheriff’s Office awarded $1 million

  • LUK Crisis Center awarded $500,000

 

“In 2017, over 2,000 Massachusetts residents died from drug overdoses,” said U.S. Attorney Andrew E. Lelling. “The opioid crisis is an unprecedented public health crisis in the United States, but we are committed to the President’s plan to end the epidemic through prevention, treatment and enforcement. With over $8 million in federal grant funding, programs in Massachusetts can expand to serve larger populations, increase services, and support those who are most impacted by this deadly epidemic. I applaud the grant recipients for their commitment to serve their communities in this way.”

Plymouth County Outreach is an opioid prevention and recovery coalition made up of 27 municipal police departments in Plymouth County, along with the Bridgewater State University Police. The chiefs have partnered with the offices of aistrict attorney Timothy Cruz and Sheriff Joseph McDonald to take a multi-jurisdictional approach to dealing with the opioid epidemic.

“The work being done by our partners in law enforcement and the treatment and healthcare industries is vital to combating this deadly epidemic. In Plymouth County and everywhere else, one overdose death is one too many,” Hanover Police Chief Walter Sweeney said.

Next week, PCO will be honored by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and will be receiving the Leadership in Community Policing Award on Oct. 9 in Orlando, Florida.

 

Middleborough man facing drugged driving charge after West Plymouth crash

A Middleborough man will face a drugged driving charge after a one-car crash Monday evening in West Plymouth.

Capt. John Rogers said the 25-year-old driver was impaired when he strayed across traffic and crashed near 91 Carver Road just after 6:30 p.m. Rogers said police found evidence of heroin use in the vehicle. The driver was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment. He will be charged with driving under the influence of drugs and driving to endanger.

 

Police accused a Kingston man of nearly running over a school resource officer and three school employees after being roused in a vehicle at Plymouth North High School Tuesday.

Tyler Burton, 30, of 17 Bradford Ave., Kingston, was later arrested in a nearby neighborhood on drug and assault charges.

Capt. John Rogers said the school resource officer and three staff members went out to check on Burton after he was seen unresponsive in a vehicle parked by the football field just before 1 p.m. Rogers said Burton woke up and drove off, nearly hitting all four people.

Police later stopped Burton on Bay View Avenue and found he was in possession of a small bag of heroin. Rogers said Burton had no connection whatsoever with the school and appears to have ingested heroin a short time before the incident.

Burton was charged with negligent driving, failure to stop for police, possession of a Class A drug (heroin) and four counts of assault with a dangerous weapon (motor vehicle).

 

Woman’s ashes found near Plymouth waterfront

Police are trying to track down the family of a woman whose cremated remains were found Friday in a waterfront parking lot.

Capt. John Rogers said the remains were in a box that was discovered in the rear of a parking lot at 112 Water St. early Friday afternoon. A label indicated that the box contained a woman’s cremated remains and identified her next of kin in Punta Gorda, Florida.

Rogers said police were unable to locate any relatives in Punt Gorda so the remains remain in Plymouth at police headquarters.

 

September 2018

 

Plymouth County Outreach to Continue Participation in AmeriCorps Program

Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri and the other 27 Plymouth County police chiefs have announced that Plymouth County Outreach is going to be participating for a second year in the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative AmeriCorps program, and will be adding a second outreach coordinator position.

PAARI received a three-year grant from the Massachusetts Service Alliance and the Corporation for National and Community Service to support the groundbreaking program. Through AmeriCorps, 25 members were placed at host police departments across eastern Massachusetts to assist with local police-led addiction and recovery programs like PCO.

In the upcoming year, PCO will be continue its partnership with Outreach Coordinator Vicky Butler and Recovery Coaches Kurt Gerold and Sloane Ferenz. The three were recognized earlier this month by PAARI at the Arlington Police Department’s first AmeriCorps graduation ceremony.

“It was great seeing Vicky, Kurt and Sloane be recognized during the graduation ceremony,” Chief Botieri said. “They have done such great work for PCO and I am glad that they will be continuing their important work throughout the next year.”

During her time with PCO, Butler has served at the East Bridgewater Police Department and Plymouth Police Department, supporting the program’s initiatives throughout Plymouth County.

Gerold is based in Hull and Hingham and supports outreach visits throughout PCO’s north region. Ferenz is based in Plymouth, where she supports the outreach efforts in the south region.

The second year of PCO’s participation in the PAARI AmeriCorps program will begin in October.

The 2018-19 PAARI AmeriCorps Program begins on Oct. 1 and has open positions for recovery coaches and capacity building fellows. PAARI is accepting applications on a rolling basis for part-time and full-time positions at several police departments across eastern Massachusetts. More information can be found by clicking here.

Interested applicants can find more information and application instructions at https://paariusa.org/americorps.

 

Carver man accused of drug trafficking in Plymouth

A months-long investigation into heroin distribution in town has resulted in the arrest of a Carver man on trafficking charges.

Police said Jason Parker, 44, of 17 Walker Road, Carver, was charged with trafficking heroin and fentanyl, possession of cocaine and illegal possession of ammunition after a search of his home Friday afternoon.

Capt. John Rogers said Parker is accused of delivering drugs to customers throughout Plymouth.

Police seized quantities of black tar and white heroin, suboxone strips, cutting agents, scales, $1,300 in cash as well as ammunition during a search by narcotics detectives from the Plymouth and Carver police departments. Police also seized two vehicles from Parker’s home.

A 48-year-old Plymouth man who was at Parker’s home was charged with simple possession of a Class A substance, Rogers said.

 

Plymouth police sporting pink patch for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

During October, uniformed personnel are allowed to replace their standard shoulder patch with the Plymouth Police Pink Patch as a reminder of the department’s commitment toward raising awareness among those it serves.

The Pink Patch Project is a collaborative public awareness campaign in partnership with more than 150 public safety agencies nationwide. Each collaborating agency in the campaign has partnered with a cancer research organization or support group in their community.

Plymouth police have partnered with the Norwell Visiting Nurse Association’s Breast Cancer Support program.

Pink Plymouth Police patches can be purchased for $10 at the Plymouth Police Department, 20 Long Pond Road, Plymouth, MA, 02360 with checks and money orders only payable to Norwell Visiting Nurse Association. They can also be purchased online at www.plymouthpolice.com

All proceeds will go directly to the NVNA’s Breast Cancer Support Program to provide services to families from Plymouth and throughout the South Shore.

 

Plymouth County opioid prevention and recovery coalition will receive a national award next month.

EAST BRIDGEWATER — Police chiefs from around the country believe law enforcement agencies in Plymouth County are on the front lines of combating opioid use.

Plymouth County Outreach, an opioid prevention and recovery coalition, will be recognized next month by the International Association of Chiefs of Police with a leadership in community policing award.

“We are extremely honored to be recognized for our collaborative efforts in helping to bring awareness and resources to those suffering from substance use disorders in our region,” said East Bridgewater Police Chief Scott Allen.

Allen, along with Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri, who are both national law enforcement council members with the Police Assisted Addiction Recovery Initiative, are the co-chairmen for the Plymouth County Drug Task Force. The task force, which brings law enforcement, doctors, educators, clergy and substance use experts together, is led by District Attorney Timothy Cruz and Sheriff Joseph McDonald.

“Our nearly 500,000 residents know that wherever they are in Plymouth County, they will find a team of compassionate and caring law enforcement officers, healthcare and recovery specialists and community leaders who are looking to offer assistance and support to those struggling with opioid use, as well as their family members and loved ones,” Allen said.

Plymouth County Outreach was created to respond to the increasing number of opiate overdoses by conducting followup visits between 12 and 24 hours after an overdose. After a person overdoses in one of the 27 participating communities, a Project Outreach team of plainclothes officers, a licensed clinician and a recovery coach conduct an in-home visit to provide resources and support to those struggling with a substance use disorder, as well as their family members. The team can also help get people into treatment.

The coalition also holds drop-in centers at various sites across the county each week. Health care providers who help with treatment options and train and distribute the overdose-reversing drug naloxone, also known as Narcan, are at the drop-in events.

“The fact that all of these professional partners from such a large variety of agencies and levels of care are engaging in this healthcare model truly shows that PCO is a community solution to a community problem,” Botieri said.

Chiefs Allen and Botieri have also been invited to present at national conferences in Bedford, Washington, D.C. and Cleveland, Ohio.

The community policing award will be presented during the International Association of Chiefs of Police’s annual conference and exposition in Orlando, Florida on Oct. 9.

 

9-11 Remembered in Plymouth

 

Chief Botieri & Lt. FLynn 9-11

Plymouth Police Chief Michael Botieri, right, and Police Lt. Dana Flynn
salute during the Pledge of Allegiance at the 9/11 Remembrance ceremony in North Plymouth on Sept. 11, 2018.

 

Manomet Woman Charged with Drunken Driving

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a Manomet woman with drunken driving Monday after a one-car crash on State Road.

Charlene Broderick, 60, of 14 Crescent St., was charged with negligent driving, possession of an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle and driving under the influence of alcohol after the 3:46 p.m. crash.

Witnesses told police Broderick was driving erratically before she crashed head-on into a tree in front of 1001 State Road. Broderick was trapped in the wreckage of the vehicle after it rolled. Firefighters extracted her and helped paramedics take her to the hospital for treatment.

Police found open and unopened nips of alcohol in the vehicle. She was charged with drunken driving based on officers’ observations at the hospital.

 

Students Shop Wit A Cop

 

PLYMOUTH – Local school resource officers became fashion consultants last week as the Plymouth Police Department celebrated its fourth annual Shop with a Cop Day for deserving students.

A dozen lucky students, three from each of the town’s middle and high schools, spent Friday morning and afternoon on a back-to-school shopping spree at Old Navy and Dick’s Sporting Goods.

The Plymouth Police Relief Association once again sponsored the event, which gave students gift cards to shop at Old Navy and Dick’s. The stores provided their own steep discounts, enabling each student to take home hundreds of dollars worth of back-to-school necessities.

Hats proved the most popular item on many students’ shopping lists, but shirts, shorts, sweats, sneakers and sandals were all part of the spree.

Police Chief Michael Botieri started the now annual back-to-school tradition three years ago, asking school officials to select deserving students for the treat.

Botieri said the shopping spree provided the district’s four school resource officers with a wonderful opportunity to make connections with students they will be seeing in school starting next week.

In addition to the shopping spree, Eastern Bank and Walmart teamed up to provide each student with backpacks filled with school supplies.

Plymouth House of Pizza and BJ’s capped the shopping adventure with a pizza party back at police headquarters.

 

August 2018

Teen Hit By Car While Visiting Ice Cream Truck

PLYMOUTH – A young man from Pelham was injured Thursday after he was hit by a truck while visiting an ice cream truck at White Horse Beach.

PLYMOUTH – A young man from Pelham was injured Thursday after he was hit by a truck while visiting an ice cream truck at White Horse Beach.

Lt. Dana Flynn said the 18-year-old had just left the truck and was crossing Taylor Avenue near the town beach access when he was struck by the passing pickup truck at 5:07 p.m.

Flynn said the teen was thrown several feet and suffered shoulder injuries. He was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment.

The driver of the pickup truck, a 56-year-old Needham woman, was cited for speeding after witnesses told police she was traveling too fast for crowded road conditions. The driver of the ice cream truck was cited for blocking a crosswalk and driving an unregistered vehicle. The ice cream truck was towed from the scene.

Three face robbery charges for Dog-napping

PLYMOUTH – Police arrested two people and will charge a third with robbery for taking a man’s dog from a downtown park Monday afternoon.

Lt. Dana Flynn said the two men and woman believed the dog’s guardian had stolen the dog, a 7-month-old boxer-mix, from their friend. Flynn said the trio pushed the 23-year-old man around and took the dog after finding them at the skate park off Summer Street shortly after 4 p.m.

Flynn said the dog is owned the suspects’ friend, but the 23-year-old man was watching the dog and was the rightful guardian of the animal. Police recovered the dog and returned the animal to the victim without incident, Flynn said.

Police arrested Christian Castelli, 20, and Carlos Sanchez, 28, both of 11 Madlyn St., on charges of unarmed robbery, assault and battery, conspiracy and disturbing the peace.

A 28-year-old woman who was also involved will be summoned to court on the same charges. Sanchez was also charged with violating an abuse prevention order because he was not supposed to be with the woman.

Man Bites off Golfer’s Finger on Golf Course

PLYMOUTH – It sounded “like someone chewing a Dorito,” a Marshfield man told police after a fellow golfer bit off the tip of his finger during a melee at Southers Marsh Golf Course Friday.

Police said the fight broke out on the ninth green during a tournament when a foursome including a Brockton man complained about slow play ahead.

Derek Harkins, 46, of 51 Ettick St., Brockton, is accused of biting off the tip of the 57-year-old Marshfield man’s left index finger during the late afternoon brawl. The severed fingertip was found in the victim’s golf glove. It was preserved in ice but could not be surgically reattached.

Police charged Harkins with mayhem, assault and battery and disturbing the peace after the incident. During arraignment Monday, he was released on $10,000 bail and ordered to be alcohol free and have no contact with the victim or witnesses.

Police reports included in the court file indicate the trouble started after the victim’s foursome allowed another foursome to play the 9th hole with them during the tournament. The eight golfers were approaching their second shots when they heard people in a third foursome yelling at them from the tee box.

The victim and members of his group told police that Harkins’ father approached them and shoved the victim after an exchange of words. Within seconds, Harkins arrived in a separate gold cart, jumped from the cart and punched the victim in the face.

The bite occurred in the melee after the two men wrestled to the ground. The victim told police Harkin grabbed his wrist, pulled his hand near his mouth and bit.

Harkins said the victim swung at his father first and that he bit down on the victim’s finger after finding himself on the bottom of the pile with hands in his eye and mouth. The fight ended when the victim yelled that his finger had been bitten off.

A golfer in the second foursome took a video of the aftermath. Police said the video showed Harkins acting out of control and trying to be restrained. There was blood on his face and mouth.

Harkins requested medical attention as well. He said he was hit in the nose and gouged in the eye. Police said Harkins had a cut over his left eye, but no visible signs of injury to his nose.

The case was continued to Wednesday for a pretrial hearing.

 

August 2018

Man bites off golfer’s finger at West Plymouth golf course

PLYMOUTH – It sounded “like someone chewing a Dorito,” a Marshfield man told police after a fellow golfer bit off the tip of his finger during a melee at Southers Marsh Golf Course Friday.

Police said the fight broke out on the ninth green during a tournament when a foursome including a Brockton man complained about slow play ahead.

Derek Harkins, 46, of 51 Ettick St., Brockton, is accused of biting off the tip of the 57-year-old Marshfield man’s left index finger during the late afternoon brawl. The severed fingertip was found in the victim’s golf glove. It was preserved in ice but could not be surgically reattached.

Police charged Harkins with mayhem, assault and battery and disturbing the peace after the incident. During arraignment Monday, he was released on $10,000 bail and ordered to be alcohol free and have no contact with the victim or witnesses.

Police reports included in the court file indicate the trouble started after the victim’s foursome allowed another foursome to play the 9th hole with them during the tournament. The eight golfers were approaching their second shots when they heard people in a third foursome yelling at them from the tee box.

The victim and members of his group told police that Harkins’ father approached them and shoved the victim after an exchange of words. Within seconds, Harkins arrived in a separate gold cart, jumped from the cart and punched the victim in the face.

The bite occurred in the melee after the two men wrestled to the ground. The victim told police Harkin grabbed his wrist, pulled his hand near his mouth and bit.

Harkins said the victim swung at his father first and that he bit down on the victim’s finger after finding himself on the bottom of the pile with hands in his eye and mouth. The fight ended when the victim yelled that his finger had been bitten off.

A golfer in the second foursome took a video of the aftermath. Police said the video showed Harkins acting out of control and trying to be restrained. There was blood on his face and mouth.

The victim told police his son found the fingertip still in his golf glove and put it in a cup of ice. He told police he would have permanent damage to the finger as doctors were unable to reattach it.

Harkins requested medical attention as well. He said he was hit in the nose and gouged in the eye. Police said Harkins had a cut over his left eye, but no visible signs of injury to his nose.

The case was continued to Wednesday for a pretrial hearing.

 

Three face robbery charges after taking a dog in Plymouth

PLYMOUTH – Police arrested two people and will charge a third with robbery for taking a man’s dog from a downtown park Monday afternoon.

Lt. Dana Flynn said the two men and woman believed the dog’s guardian had stolen the dog, a 7-month-old boxer-mix, from their friend. Flynn said the trio pushed the 23-year-old man around and took the dog after finding them at the skate park off Summer Street shortly after 4 p.m.

Flynn said the dog is owned the suspects’ friend, but the 23-year-old man was watching the dog and was the rightful guardian of the animal. Police recovered the dog and returned the animal to the victim without incident, Flynn said.

Police arrested Christian Castelli, 20, and Carlos Sanchez, 28, both of 11 Madlyn St., on charges of unarmed robbery, assault and battery, conspiracy and disturbing the peace.

A 28-year-old woman who was also involved will be summoned to court on the same charges. Sanchez was also charged with violating an abuse prevention order because he was not supposed to be with the woman.

 A local man was knocked from his motorcycle by a low-hanging utility line.

Police said the 44-year-old man was traveling near 44 Standish Ave. when he was knocked from his motorcycle by a wire that had been partially knocked down by a passing truck. The motorcyclist suffered bumps, bruises and road rash, but was not seriously injured, police said.

He was taken to BID-Plymouth hospital for treatment. Police were unable to locate the truck that knocked down the wire.

 

Plymouth police receive driving patrols grant

PLYMOUTH — The Plymouth Police Department will increase impaired driving patrols on local roads with grant funds from the Highway Safety Division of the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security. The Plymouth Police will joint local departments across the state as well as the Massachusetts State Police in the national Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement mobilization and public information campaign.

This year’s campaign will urge drivers drinking alcohol or using marijuana and other drugs to plan ahead and designate a sober driver, use a ride-share service or take public transportation.

“Impaired drivers create a dangerous situation for everyone around them,” said Chief Michael Botieri. “This grant will help increase our efforts during the busy summer travel season to keep our roads free of impaired drivers and avoid the tragedy they wreak.”

“Getting behind the wheel after drinking alcohol, using marijuana or both is one of the most dangerous things drivers can do,” Said Jeff Larason, director of the Highway Safety Division. “A little planning can save your life or someone else’s. Regret or remorse won’t bring someone back.”

West Plymouth man charged with third drunken driving offense

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a local man as a repeat drunken driving offender Tuesday after a traffic stop in West Plymouth.

PLYMOUTH – Police charged a local man as a repeat drunken driving offender Tuesday after a traffic stop in West Plymouth.

Richard Covell, 30, of 26 Lisa Ave., was arrested shortly after noon on charges of driving under the influence of alcohol as a third offense and negligent driving.

Lt. Dana Flynn said police stopped Covell after an off-duty officer from Carver reported seeing him driving erratically. Flynn said Covell exhibited classic symptoms of intoxication after he was stopped on Flint Locke Drive. Flynn said Covell had prior drunken driving convictions in 2017 and 2008.

Naked man arrested at Plymouth Beach

PLYMOUTH – Police arrested a Marshfield man who was found naked in his vehicle at Plymouth Beach Tuesday morning.

The 45-year-old man was charged with accosting or annoying a person sexually.

Lt. Dana Flynn said beach employees found the naked man sitting in his car in the parking lot watching pornography on his cellphone.

 

 

 

July 2018

 

Jury indicts Plymouth man charged with shooting at wife, police

By Patriot Ledger staff
Posted Jul 11, 2018 at 3:01 PM
Updated Jul 11, 2018 at 8:27 PM

BROCKTON – A grand jury has indicted a Plymouth man charged with firing a gun at his wife, a child and several police officers before being shot himself this spring.

Michael Walsh, 36, is facing seven counts each of armed assault to murder and assault with a dangerous weapon as well as two counts of destruction of property over $1,200 and one count each of unlicensed possession of a firearm and firing a gun within 500 feet of a building. The indictment moves his case from district court to superior court, where more serious cases are prosecuted and defendants face longer sentences if convicted.

Walsh was ordered held without bail at his April district court arraignment, which was held at his bedside at Massachusetts General Hospital. His bail on two open cases out of Plymouth and Wareham district courts was also revoked.

Walsh’s arraignment in superior court has not yet been scheduled.

Prosecutors say Walsh’s wife was trying to leave their house on Federal Furnace Road on April 26 when Walsh, who had been abusing her, came out of the house and fired several shots at her as she drove away. Prosecutors say two of the shots hit the car but did not injure the wife or a child who was with her.

When police arrived at the house in response to a 911 call from the wife, prosecutors say Walsh came out the front door and fired a single shot at officers before going back inside. He then returned moments later and fired additional rounds at the five officers outside, hitting some of their vehicles, prosecutors say.

Plymouth police returned fire and hit Walsh as he ran around in the front yard. Walsh fell to the ground and was taken to a Boston hospital in a medical helicopter.

 

PLYMOUTH – The man accused of shooting at police in West Plymouth in April has been indicted by a Plymouth County grand jury.

Michael Walsh, 36, was indicted Tuesday on seven counts each of armed assault to murder and assault with a dangerous weapon, two counts of destruction of property worth more than $1,200 and single counts of possession of a firearm without an FID card and discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a building.

Walsh will be arraigned on the charges in Superior Court at a later date, District Attorney Timothy Cruz announced Wednesday.

The charges stem from an an April 26 domestic disturbance at Walsh’s home at 622 Federal Furnace Road.

Walsh’s wife reported that evening that he had been abusive and fired several shots at her car, striking it twice, as she left the home with a child.

An investigation found that when local police arrived, Walsh came out of the front door of his house and fired a shot at police before retreating back inside.

Moments later, Walsh once again exited the front door, firing several rounds at the five responding officers. Some of the shots hit police cruisers. None of the officers was wounded.

Plymouth police fired their weapons and struck Walsh as he ran through his front yard. He was airlifted to a Boston hospital for treatment and was later charged in district court with related charges. The indictments elevate the case to Superior Court, where the charges carry more serious potential penalties.

Walsh has been held without bail since the shooting.

 

Plymouth Police recently welcomed seven new recruits to the department.

New PPD Officers

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Left: Five new Plymouth police officers graduated from the Plymouth Police Academy last week. From left are officers Richard Smythe, Thomas Foley, Chief Michael Botieri, Brett Walsh, Eric Coon and Andrew Barry.

Right: Officer Ryan Croak is a recent transfer from the Rockland Police Department. Officer Kyle Gorham graduated from the Randolph Police Academy in June.

PLYMOUTH – Local police recently welcomed seven new recruits to the department.

Officer Ryan Croak is a recent transfer from the Rockland Police Department. Officer Kyle Gorham graduated from the Randolph Police Academy in June. Officers Richard Smythe, Thomas Foley, Brett Walsh, Eric Coon and Andrew Barry graduated from the Plymouth Police Academy last week.

The officers filled vacancies created through retirement and other attrition.

Last week’s graduates are now completing a two-week orientation and will be partnered this month with veteran officers for additional field training. Gorham is currently partnered with an officer for field training. Croak is already assigned to patrol duties.

June 2018

Cruiser Convoy

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PLYMOUTH – Officer Alex South recently represented local police in the annual Special Olympics police cruiser convoy to Harvard Stadium.

South joined officers from around the state in convoying to the stadium to recognize Special Olympic athletes. South helped present medals to athletes at the stadium.

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